A comparative proteomics survey of proteins responsive to phosphorous starvation in roots of hydroponically-grown rice seedlings

  • Sang Gon Kim
  • Yiming Wang
  • Chang Hoon Lee
  • Bong Gyu Mun
  • Pil Joo Kim
  • Sang Yeol Lee
  • Yong Chul Kim
  • Kyu Young Kang
  • Randeep Rakwal
  • Ganesh Kumar Agrawal
  • Sun Tae Kim
Biochemistry Article

Abstract

Rice takes up phosphorous (P) as major nutrient source for its growth and development when grown under anaerobic water-logged soil conditions. To better understand the underlying mechanisms and to develop potential protein biomarkers of P-starvation, hydroponically-grown rice seedlings in the complete media and phosphorus absence (P-starvation) of phosphorous nutrient solutions were investigated for physiological and proteome changes. The P-starvation manifested significant reduction in root growth in three-week-old seedlings compared to respective complete media. Furthermore, P-starvation also showed increased activity of acid phosphatase in roots of one- and three-week-old seedlings, suggesting that experimental design is suitable for proteomics survey of P-starvation responsive proteins. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis of total root protein from three-week-old seedlings identified 10 P-starvation responsive protein spots out of 140 high-quality protein spots. Identified 10 proteins were involved in metabolism and defense/stress response. Out of 10, 2 and 8 protein spots were found to be upand down-regulated, respectively. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of corresponding genes of four randomly selected proteins, including putative glyceraldehydes-3-phophate dehydrogenase (G3PDH, spot R1), S-adenosyl-l-methionine synthetase (SAMS, spot R4), ATP synthase subunit alpha (spot R6), and root-specific pathogenesisrelated protein 10 (PR-10, spot R8), showed that just as protein abundance, these proteins are also regulated at the transcript level. Results suggest identified P-starvation responsive proteins are involved in maintaining nutrient homeostasis and/or associated with changes in root physiology under the absence of P.

Key words

acid phosphatase 2-dimensional electrophoresis phosphorous starvation proteomics rice 

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Copyright information

© Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry and Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sang Gon Kim
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yiming Wang
    • 2
  • Chang Hoon Lee
    • 2
  • Bong Gyu Mun
    • 2
  • Pil Joo Kim
    • 2
  • Sang Yeol Lee
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yong Chul Kim
    • 6
  • Kyu Young Kang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Randeep Rakwal
    • 4
    • 5
  • Ganesh Kumar Agrawal
    • 5
  • Sun Tae Kim
    • 6
  1. 1.Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research CenterGyeongsang National UniversityJinjuRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 program)Gyeongsang National UniversityJinjuRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research CenterGyeongsang National UniversityJinjuRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.School of MedicineShowa UniversityShinagawa, TokyoJapan
  5. 5.Research Laboratory for Biotechnology and Biochemistry (RLABB)KathmanduNepal
  6. 6.Department of Plant BiosciencePusan National UniversityMiryangRepublic of Korea

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