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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 102–130 | Cite as

Surveying the technology landscape: Teachers’ use of technology in secondary mathematics classrooms

  • Merrilyn Goos
  • Anne Bennison
Articles

Abstract

For many years, education researchers excited by the potential for digital technologies to transform mathematics teaching and learning have predicted that these technologies would become rapidly integrated into every level of education. However, recent international research shows that technology still plays a marginal role in mathematics classrooms. These trends deserve investigation in the Australian context, where over the past 10 years secondary school mathematics curricula have been revised to allow or require use of digital technologies in learning and assessment tasks. This paper reports on a survey of mathematics teachers’ use of computers, graphics calculators, and the Internet in Queensland secondary schools, and examines relationships between use and teachers’ pedagogical knowledge and beliefs, access to technology, and professional development opportunities. Although access to all forms of technology was a significant factor related to use, teacher beliefs and participation in professional development were also influential. Teachers wanted professional development that modelled planning and pedagogy so they could meaningfully integrate technology into their lessons in ways that help students learn mathematical concepts. The findings have implications not only for resourcing of schools, but also for designing professional development that engages teachers with technology in their local professional contexts.

Keywords

Professional Development Mathematics Teacher Mathematics Classroom Graphic Calculator Pedagogical Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Inc. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Merrilyn Goos
    • 1
  • Anne Bennison
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of QueenslandAustralia

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