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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 78–102 | Cite as

The mathematical knowledge and understanding young children bring to school

  • Barbara Clarke
  • Jill Cheeseman
  • Doug Clarke
Articles

Abstract

As part of the Victorian Early Numeracy Research Project, over 1400 Victorian children in the first (Preparatory) year of school were assessed in mathematics by their classroom teachers. Using a task-based, one-to-one interview, administered during the first and last month of the school year, a picture emerged of the mathematical knowledge and understanding that young children bring to school, and the changes in this knowledge and understanding during the first year of school. A major feature of this research was that high quality, robust information on young children’s mathematical understanding was collected for so many children. An important finding was that much of what has traditionally formed the mathematics curriculum for the first year of school was already understood clearly by many children on arrival at school. In this article, data on children’s understanding are shared, and some implications for classroom practice are discussed.

Keywords

Mathematical Knowledge National Council Early Childhood Education American Educational Research Association Percentage Success 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Clarke
    • 1
  • Jill Cheeseman
    • 1
  • Doug Clarke
    • 2
  1. 1.Monash UniversityAustralia
  2. 2.Australian Catholic UniversityAustralia

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