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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 154–168 | Cite as

Pedagogic discourse and equity in mathematics: When teachers’ talk matters

  • Lena Licón Khisty
  • Kathryn B. Chval
Articles

Abstract

In this paper, we discuss the role and nature of pedagogic discourse. We argue that teachers’ talk plays a much more important role in students’ learning than is often considered—particularly in the learning of racially, ethnically, and linguistically diverse students. We present one teacher who has a record of assisting her fifth grade Latino students to make significant academic gains in mathematics, and we examine the way she uses her talk in teaching and how students in her class develop control over the mathematics discourse. To help make our point, we contrast this teacher with another teacher whose instructional talk is not as mathematically rich.

Keywords

Mathematics Classroom English Language Learner Mathematical Discourse Complete Sentence Academic Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lena Licón Khisty
    • 1
  • Kathryn B. Chval
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Education (M/C147)University of Illinois at ChicagoChicago
  2. 2.National Science FoundationArlington

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