The Australian Educational Researcher

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 33–54 | Cite as

The condition of secondary school physics education in the Philippines: Recent developments and remaining challenges for substantive improvements

  • Antriman V. Orleans
Article

Abstract

This study is aimed at assessing the state of Philippine secondary school physics education using data from a nationwide survey of 464 schools and 767 physics teachers and at identifying challenges for substantive improvements. Teacher-related indicators revealed academic qualification deficiency, low continuing professional involvements, substantial physics teaching experience, and good licensure status. Academic environment indices revealed that the number of physics classes per teacher is manageable, but the individual classes are large. Results also showed limited instructional materials and technologies, the unpopularity of professional mentoring, and favorable library and internet access. Based on these findings, challenges to developing a larger pool of competent physics teachers and equipping schools with relevant instructional devices were identified.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Amid, D. (1998)Development and validation of a proposed work-text in analytic geometry, Unpublished master’s thesis, Centro Escolar University, Manila.Google Scholar
  2. Ariota, R. (1997)Proposed instructional materials in the teaching of mathematics at La Salette College of Engineering, Santiago City, Unpublished master’s thesis, Saint Paul University, Santiago City.Google Scholar
  3. Avila, A. (1998)Design and evaluation of a computer-assisted instruction material in heat and thermodynamics, Unpublished master’s thesis, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  4. Becta (2003) “Secondary Schools — ICT and Standards: An analysis of national data from Ofsted and QCA”, Retrieved: June 8, 2004. 〈http://www.becta.org.uk/page_documents/research/secschoolfull.pdf〉.Google Scholar
  5. Brown, C. A., Smith, M. S., and Stein, M. K. (1995) Linking teacher support to enhanced classroom instruction. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. New York.Google Scholar
  6. Calacal, S. (1999)An analysis of the physics competencies of Mariano Marcos State University students under the New Secondary Education Curriculum (NSEC), Unpublished doctoral dissertation, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  7. California Education Policy Seminar and California State University Institute for Educational Reform (1998)Doing what matters most: Investing in quality teaching, California State University Institute for Educational Reform, USA.Google Scholar
  8. Capili, M. (1987)Development of laboratory manual in physics for students enrolled in the double secondary curriculum with a thrust in the arts, Unpublished master’s thesis, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  9. Capistrano, N. (1999)Students alternative conceptions in introductory college physics courses, Unpublished master’s thesis, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  10. Cohen, D. K. and Hill, H. (1997) Instructional policy and classroom performance: The mathematics reform in California. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Chicago, Illinois.Google Scholar
  11. Coleman, J., Campbell, E., Hobson, C., McPartland, J., Mood, A., Weinfeld, F., and York, R. (1996)Equality of educational opportunity, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  12. Contreras, V. (2005) US needs 200,000 teachers yearly, say placement firm,Philippine Daily Inquirer, 16 November.Google Scholar
  13. Corpuz, E. (1998)Effects of a computer instruction program on college students’ performance in solving simple problems in mechanics, Unpublished master’s thesis, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  14. Curammeng, G. (1993)Development and Evaluation of a laboratory manual in College Physics I for engineering students using standard and improved apparatus, Unpublished master’s thesis, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  15. Darling-Hammond, L. (1998) Doing what matters most: Investing in quality teaching, in a discussion sponsored by the California Education Policy Seminar and California State University Institute for Educational Reform.Google Scholar
  16. Darling-Hammond, L. (2000) “Teacher Quality and Student Achievement: A Review of State Policy Evidence“, Educational Policy Analysis Archives, 8(1), viewed 9 June 2004 〈http://epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v8n1/〉.Google Scholar
  17. Ferguson, R. (1998) Can schools narrow the black-white test score gap?, in C. Jencks and M. Philipps, eds.,The Black-White Test Score Gap, The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  18. Figuerres, O. (1985)An analysis of the physics achievement of engineering students from selected colleges and universities in Region I, Unpublished master’s thesis, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  19. Flores, A. (1989)A proposed workbook in algebra for an agricultural school, Unpublished master’s thesis, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  20. Goldhaber, D. and Anthony, E. (2003) “Teacher quality and student achievement”, ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education Urban Diversity Series, Retrieved: June 9, 2004. 〈http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&ERICExtSearch_ SearchValue_0=Goldhaber+%26+Anthony&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=authors& _pageLabel=RecordDetails&objectId=0900000b8011f92e〉.Google Scholar
  21. Goldhaber, D. (2002) The mystery of good teaching: Surveying the evidence on student achievement and teachers’ characteristics,Education Next, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 50–55.Google Scholar
  22. Goldhaber, D., Brewer, D. and Anderson, D. (1999) A three-way error components analysis of educational productivity,Education Economics, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 199–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Hanushek, E., Kain, J. and Rivkin, S. (1999) “Do higher salaries buy better teachers?”, Working Paper No. 7082, National Bureau of Economics Research, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  24. Hawk, P., Coble, C.R. and Swanson, M. (1985) Certification: It does matter,Journal of Teacher Education, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 13–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement. (2004)TIMSS 2003 International Science Report, TIMSS & PIRLS International Study Center, Lynch School of Education, Boston College, USA.Google Scholar
  26. Jordan, H., Mendro, R. and Weeasinghe, D. (1997) Teacher effects on longitudinal student achievement. Paper presented at the National Evaluation Annual Meeting, Indianapolis.Google Scholar
  27. Kington, A., Harris, S., Smith, P. and Hall, M. (2003) “Computers for Teachers. A qualitative evaluation of Phase 1”, Report to the DfES, ICT in Schools Research and Evaluation Series No. 14, Retrieved: June 8, 2004. 〈http://www.becta.org.uk/page_documents/research/cft_qual_eval_phase1.pdf〉.Google Scholar
  28. Logmao, D. (1997)Effectiveness of programmed instruction using audio-visual technique in teaching physics, Unpublished master’s thesis, Philippine Normal University, Manila.Google Scholar
  29. Lontayao, R. (1999)Effectiveness of video instruction in teaching concepts on aquatic ecosystem to second year high school students of selected public high schools school year 1998–1999, Unpublished master’s thesis, Mindanao State University — Iligan Institute of Technology, Iligan City.Google Scholar
  30. Mayer, D., Mullens, J. and Moore, M. (2001) “Monitoring school quality: A indicators report”, Education Statistics Quarterly, 3(1), viewed 9 June 2004 〈http://nces.ed.gov/programs/quarterly/vol_3/3_1/q4_4.asp#top〉.Google Scholar
  31. Mehrotra, S. and Buckland P. (1998) “Managing teacher costs for access and quality”, UNICEF Staff Working Papers, No. EPP-EVL-98-004, Retrieved: 23 May 2006. 〈http://www.unicef.org/evaldatabase/files/Global_1998_Managing_Teacher.pdf〉.Google Scholar
  32. Orleans, A. (1994)The relative effectiveness of calculus-based college physics instructions on student achievement, Unpublished mater’s thesis, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  33. Philippine Department of Education, Culture, and Sports, Department of Science and Technology Science Education Institute, and University of the Philippines National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development (2000) TIMSS-R Philippine Report,Volume 1: Science.Google Scholar
  34. Philippine Department of Education (2005) “DepEd targets computerization of all public schools by 2008”, Retrieved: April 4, 2005. http://www.gov.ph/cat_education/newscontent.asp?newsid=7743.Google Scholar
  35. Philippine Department of Science and Technology Science Education Institute (2005) “Programs and Projects”, Retrieved: April 4, 2005. 〈http://www.sei.dost.gov.ph/programs.html〉.Google Scholar
  36. Philippine National Statistics Office (2005) “Index of demographic statistics”, Retrieved: May 30, 2006. 〈http://www.census.gov.ph/data/sectordata/datapop.html〉.Google Scholar
  37. Philippine National Statistics Office (2003) “Philippines: Urban population was registered at 48.05 percent”, Retrieved: May 30, 2006. 〈http://www.census.gov.ph/data/pressrelease/2003/pr0382tx.html〉.Google Scholar
  38. Plaza, L. (1996)Development and validation of issue-oriented supplementary materials in ecology, Unpublished master’s thesis, Philippine Normal University, Manila.Google Scholar
  39. Sanders, W. and Horn, S. (1998) Research findings from the Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System (TVAAS) database: Implications for educational evaluation and research,Journal of Personal Evaluation in Education, vol. 12, no. 3.Google Scholar
  40. Sanders, W. L. and Rivers, J. C. (1996) Cumulative and residual effects of teachers on future academic achievement, University of Tennessee Value-Added Research and Assessment Center.Google Scholar
  41. Schmidt, W. & Cogan, L. (1996) Development of the TIMSS Context Questionnaires, in M. Martin and D. Kelly, eds.,Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Technical Report, Volume 1: Design and Development, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA.Google Scholar
  42. Tribiana, E. (1991)Development of molecular models for use in teaching selected topics in organic chemistry. Unpublished master’s thesis, De La Salle University, Manila.Google Scholar
  43. UK Department of Education and Skills (2003) “The big pICTure: The impact of ICT on attainment, motivation and learning”, by V. Pittard, P. Bannister, and J. Dunn, Retrieved: June 9, 2004. 〈http://www.ioe.ac.uk/schools/clc/matesol/ technology/files/ICT_research/The_big_picture.pdf〉.Google Scholar
  44. Undag, M. C. (1996)Television programs as instructional media resource: Effects on achievement and attitude in science, Unpublished master’s thesis, University of the Philippines, Quezon City.Google Scholar
  45. US Department of Education (1999)Defining effective professional development: Lessons from the Eisenhower program, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  46. US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (1998) “Towards better teaching: Professional development in 1993-94”, NCES 98-230, by Susan Choy and Xianglei Chen, Project Officer: Micheal Ross, Retrieved: June 8, 2004. 〈http://nces.ed.gov/pubs98/98230.pdf〉.Google Scholar
  47. US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2000) “Schoollevel correlates of academic achievement: Student assessment scores in SASS public schools”, NCES 2000-303, by Donald McLaughlin and Gili Drori, Project Officer: Ross, M., Retrieved: June 8, 2004. 〈http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2000/2000303.pdf〉.Google Scholar
  48. Wiley, D. and Yoon, B. (1995) Teacher reports of opportunity to learn: Analyses of the 1993 California Learning Assessment System,Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 355–370.Google Scholar
  49. Wright, P., Horn, S. and Sanders, W. (1997) Teacher and classroom context effects on student achievement: Implications for teacher evaluation,Journal of Personnel Evaluation in Education, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, no. 11, pp. 57–67.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Australian Association for Research in Education 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antriman V. Orleans
    • 1
  1. 1.Hiroshima UniversityJapan

Personalised recommendations