Journal of Applied Genetics

, Volume 50, Issue 4, pp 391–398 | Cite as

Frequencies of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor genotypes influence susceptibility to spontaneous abortion

  • I. Nowak
  • A. Malinowski
  • H. Tchórzewski
  • E. Barcz
  • J. R. Wilczyński
  • M. Gryboś
  • M. Kurpisz
  • W. Łuszczek
  • M. Banasik
  • D. Reszczyńska-Ślęzak
  • E. Majorczyk
  • A. Wiśniewski
  • D. Senitzer
  • J. Yao Sun
  • P. Kuśnierczyk
Original Article

Abstract

Natural killer (NK) cells are the most abundant lymphocyte population in the decidua. These cells express killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which upon recognition of HLA class I molecules on trophoblasts may either stimulate NK cells (activating KIRs) or inhibit them (inhibitory KIRs) to produce soluble factors necessary for the maintenance of pregnancy.KIR genes exhibit extensive haplotype polymorphism; individuals differ in both the number and kind (activating vs. inhibitory) ofKIR genes. This polymorphism affects NK cell reactivity and susceptibility to diseases, including gynecological disorders. Therefore weKIR-genotyped 149 spontaneously aborting women and 117 control multiparae (at least 2 healthy-born children). Several genotypes (i.e. combinations of variousKIR genes) were differently distributed among the patients and control subjects. Differences were observed in the numbers and the ratios of activating to inhibitory KIRs between patients and healthy women: (i) genotypes containing 6 activatingKIR genes were less frequent and those containing 6 inhibitoryKIR genes were more frequent in patients than in control subjects, and (ii) an excess of inhibitory KIRs (activating-to-inhibitoryKIR gene ratios of 0.33 to 0.83) was associated with miscarriage, whereas ratios close to equilibrium (0.86–1.25) seemed to be protective. In addition, the results suggest for the first time that sporadic and recurrent spontaneous abortions as well as miscarriage in the presence or absence of autoantibodies may have differentKIR genotypic backgrounds.

Keywords

killer immunoglobulin-like receptor KIR genotype natural killer cell spontaneous abortion 

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Copyright information

© Institute of Plant Genetics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Nowak
    • 1
  • A. Malinowski
    • 2
  • H. Tchórzewski
    • 2
  • E. Barcz
    • 3
  • J. R. Wilczyński
    • 2
  • M. Gryboś
    • 4
  • M. Kurpisz
    • 5
  • W. Łuszczek
    • 1
  • M. Banasik
    • 2
  • D. Reszczyńska-Ślęzak
    • 4
  • E. Majorczyk
    • 1
  • A. Wiśniewski
    • 1
  • D. Senitzer
    • 6
  • J. Yao Sun
    • 6
  • P. Kuśnierczyk
    • 1
    • 7
  1. 1.Laboratory of Immunogenetics and Tissue Immunology, Department of Clinical Immunology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental TherapyPolish Academy of SciencesWrocławPoland
  2. 2.Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital - Research InstituteŁódźPoland
  3. 3.Medical University of WarsawPoland
  4. 4.Wrocław Medical UniversityPoland
  5. 5.Institute of Human GeneticsPolish Academy of SciencesPoznańPoland
  6. 6.City of Hope National Medical CenterDuarteUSA
  7. 7.Jan Długosz Pedagogical UniversityCzęstochowaPoland

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