Journal of Applied Genetics

, Volume 50, Issue 3, pp 257–259 | Cite as

Known mutation (A3072G) in intron 3 of theIGF2 gene is associated with growth and carcass composition in Polish pig breeds

  • M. Oczkowicz
  • M. Tyra
  • K. Walinowicz
  • M. Różycki
  • B. Rejduch
Short Communication

Abstract

IGF2 is one of the genes that control muscle development. Moreover,IGF2 is imprinted, as only the paternal allele is expressed in the offspring. Using real-time PCR forIGF2 genotyping (Carrodegous et al. 2005), we evaluated the frequency of theIGF2 A3072G mutation (Van Laere et al. 2003) in pigs: Polish Landrace (PL,N = 271) and Large White (LW,N = 267). Our results are consistent with previous reports, showing that theA allele is common in breeds subjected to strong selection for lean meat content (A allele frequency was 0.79 in LW and 0.69 in PL). Moreover, we compared body composition, growth performance and meat quality traits in pigs carrying opposite genotypes (A/A andG/G) inthe IGF2 gene. The association study revealed that theA allele increases the weight of loin (WL) (additive gene effect = 450±50 g in LW and 213±64g in PL), weight of ham (WH) (544±48 g in LW and 302±72 g in PL), loin eye area (LEA) (4.9±0.46 cm2 in LW and 2.1 ±0.95 cm2 in PL), carcass meat percentage (CP) (3.12±0.27% in LW and 1.89±0.47% in PL), and decreases average backfat thickness (ABF) (−0.2±0.036 cm in LW and −0.2±0.048 cm in PL). Additionally, in PL, theA allele increases the weight of tenderloin (WT) (11±0.01 g), average daily gain (ADG) (30.7±17.29 g), and decreases feed intake (F) (−121±45 g) and days of feeding (DF) (−3.5±2.08 days). No significant effects were observed for meat quality traits. Our results suggest that selection based on theIGF2 mutation in Poland may be very useful in PL and LW pigs, where theG allele is still relatively frequent.

Keywords

carcass composition growth performance IGF2 imprinting mutation pig 

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References

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Copyright information

© Institute of Plant Genetics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Oczkowicz
    • 1
  • M. Tyra
    • 1
  • K. Walinowicz
    • 1
  • M. Różycki
    • 1
  • B. Rejduch
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Animal Genetics and BreedingNational Research Institute of Animal ProductionPoland
  2. 2.Department of Animal Immuno- and CytogeneticsNational Research Institute of Animal ProductionBalicePoland

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