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Chinese Science Bulletin

, Volume 48, Issue 4, pp 363–367 | Cite as

Quaternary high-resolution opal record and its paleoproductivity implication at ODP Site 1143, southern South China Sea

  • Rujian WangEmail author
  • Jian Li
Reports

Abstract

The correlation of opal content and MAR with oxygen isotopic records of benthonic foraminifera at Site 1143, southern South China Sea indicates that, since about 900 ka, the increasing opal content and MAR during the interglacial periods is inferred to reflect the higher surface productivity, for the intensified summer monsoon during the interglacial periods would result in the enhanced upwelling and nutrient supply. Time-sequence spectral analyses of oxygen isotopic record, opal content and MAR at intervals of 0–900 ka reveal that the changes of surface productivity were dominantly forced by the variations of the earth orbital cycles.

Keywords

opal MAR paleoproductivity obital forcing Quaternary South China Sea 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Marine Geology, MEOTongji UniversityShanghaiChina

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