Advertisement

Studies on follicular growth in the immature rat and hamster: Effect of a single injection of gonadotropin or estrogen on the rate of3H-thymidine incorporation into ovarian DNAin vitro

  • C S Sheela Rani
  • N R Moudgal
Endocrinology
  • 26 Downloads

Abstract

Initiation of follicular growth by specific hormonal stimuli in ovaries of immature rats and hamsters was studied by determining the rate of incorporation of3H-thymidine into ovarian DNAin vitro. Incorporation was considered as an index of DNA synthesis and cell multiplication.

A single injection of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin could thus maximally stimulate by 18 hr3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of the ovary of immature hamsters. Neutralization of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin by an antiserum to ovine follicle stimulating hormone only during the initial 8–10 hr and not later could inhibit the increase in3H-thymidine incorporationin vitro observed at 18 hr, suggesting that the continued presence of gonadotropin stimulus was not necessary for this response. The other indices of follicular growth monitored such as ovarian weight, serum estradiol and uterine weight showed discernible increase at periods only after the above initial event.

A single injection of estrogen (diethyl stilbesterol or estradiol-l7β) could similarly cause 18 hr later, a stimulation in the rate of incorporation of3H-thymidine into DNAin vitro in ovaries of immature rats. The presence of endogenous gonadotropins, however, was obligatory for observing this response to estrogen. Evidence in support of the above was two-fold: (i) administration of antiserum to follicle stimulating hormone or luteinizing hormone along with estrogen completely inhibited the increase in3H-thymidine incorporation into ovarian DNAin vitro; (ii) a radioimmunological measurement revealed following estrogen treatment, the presence of a higher concentration of endogenous follicle stimulating hormone in the ovary. Finally, administration of varying doses of ovine follicle stimulating hormone along with a constant dose of estrogen to immature rats produced a dose-dependent increment in the incorporation of3H-thymidine into ovarian DNAin vitro. These observations suggested the potentiality of this system for developing a sensitive bioassay for follicle stimulating hormone.

Keywords

Pregnant mare serum gonadotropin follicle stimulating hormone luteinizing hormone estrogen gonadotropin antisera ovarian follicular growth 3H-thymidine incorporation into ovarian DNA bioassay for follicle stimulating hormone 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cole H H 1936Am. J. Anat. 59 299CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Costoff A, Eldridge J C and Mahesh V B 1974Cell Tissue Res. 151 79PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Fevold H L, Hisaw F L and Leonard S L 1931Am. J. Physiol. 97 291Google Scholar
  4. Goldenberg R L, Vaitukaitis J L and Ross G T 1972Endocrinology 90 1492PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Greenwald G S 1974Anat. Rec. 178 139PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Greenwood F C, Hunter W M and Glover H S 1963Biochem. J. 89 244Google Scholar
  7. Louvet J P and Vaitukaitis J L 1976Endocrinology 99 758PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Moudgal N R and Madhwa Raj H G 1974 inMethods of Hormone Radioimmunoassay eds B M Jaffe and H R Behrman (New York: Academic Press) p. 57Google Scholar
  9. Mukku V and Moudgal N R 1975Endocrinology 97 1455PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Parker C R Jr, Costoff A, Moldoon T G and Mahesh V B 1976Endocrinology 98 129PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Pederson T 1970Acta Endocrinol Copenhagen 64 304Google Scholar
  12. Pederson T and Peters H 1968J. Reprod. Fert. 17 555CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Pencharz R I 1940Science 91 554PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Peters H and Levy E 1966J. Reprod. Fert. 11 227CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Richards J S, Ireland J J, Rao M C, Bernath G A, Midgley A R Jr. and Reichert L E Jr. 1976Endocrinology 99 1562PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Sasamoto S and Kennan A L 1973Endocrinology 93 292PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Sashida T and Johnson DC 1976Acta Endocrinol. Copenhagen 82 413Google Scholar
  18. Schwartz N B 1974Biol. Reprod. 10 236PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Sheela Rani C S 1977Studies on Gonadotropins: Gonadotropic Regulation of Follicular Maturation in Cyclic Hamster using Antisera to FSH and LH; Ph.D. Thesis Indian Institute of Science BangaloreGoogle Scholar
  20. Sheela Rani C S and Moudgal N R 1977aEndocrinology 101 1484PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Sheela Rani C S and Moudgal N R 1977bJ. Reprod. Fert. 50 37CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Simpson ME, Evans H M, Fraenkel-Conrat H L and Li C H 1941Endocrinology 28 37CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Williams P C 1940Nature 145 388CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Wilson C A, Horth C E, Endersby C A and McDonald P G 1974J. Endocr. 60 293PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • C S Sheela Rani
    • 1
  • N R Moudgal
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Endocrine Biochemistry, Department of BiochemistryIndian Institute of ScienceBangalore

Personalised recommendations