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Carbonates and Evaporites

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 37–48 | Cite as

Late Cambrian cabbage-head stromatolites from Saratoga Springs, New York, USA

  • Gerald M. FriedmanEmail author
Article

Abstract

Saratoga Springs, New York, is the site of one of the finest examples of domed stromatolites to be seen anywhere in ancient rocks and is significant in the history of geology as the area where stromatolites were first described and interpreted. These cabbage-head structures, which are part of the Hoyt Limestone of Late Cambrian (Late Franconian to Early Trempeleauan) age, were described by James Hall as early as 1847. Glaciated surfaces expose horizontal sections of the cabbage-shaped heads composed of vertically stacked, hemispherical stromatolites. The microbial heads are discrete domal structures built of hemispheroidal and bulbous stromatolites expanding upward from a base. The heads, many of them compound, are circular in horizontal section, and range in diameter from a few centimeters to a meter. Between the heads are ooids, skeletal fragments of trilobites, brachiopods, pelecypods, and quartz-sand particles.

The earliest reference to stromatolites in this area was that of Steele (1825) whose description included the first reported oolitic limestone in North America among which the stromatolites occur. The depositional environment was that of a peritidal setting involving oolite shoals, lagoons, and intertidal flats.

Keywords

Cambrian Ordovician Lithofacies Stromatolite Ooids 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeologyBrooklyn College and Graduate Center of the City University of New YorkBrooklyn
  2. 2.Rensselaer Center of Applied GeologyNortheastern Science Foundation affiliated with Brooklyn CollegeTroyUSA

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