Advertisement

Carbonates and Evaporites

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 86–89 | Cite as

Biomineralization of mirabilite deposits of Barkol Lake, China

  • Wei Dongyan
  • Liu Zhenmin
  • Deng Xiaolin
  • Xu Shaokang
Article

Abstract

Large amounts of halophilic organisms and their fossils that are found in the Barkol mirabilite deposit are identical to those of its modern biological community residing in its surface brines.

The extent of investigation to which organisms contributed to the mirabilite mineralization in the Barkol Lake demonstrates that the genetic mechanism of this type of ore deposit is better explained by biochemical deposition than by the widely accepted, purely chemical deposition which, though approved by classical geologists, will certainly be revised in the future.

Keywords

Halite Evaporite Salt Mineral Fecal Pellet Brine Shrimp 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. GWYNN, J.W. (ed.), 1980, Great Salt Lake A Scientific, Historical, and Economic Overview, p. 305–309.Google Scholar
  2. HAY, R.W., 1984, Bio-inorganic chemistry. Ellis Horwood Ltd. Great Britain, p. 75–89.Google Scholar
  3. ZHENG MIANPING, XIANG JUN, WEI XIN JUN, and ZHENG YUAN, 1989, Saline Lakes on the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) plateau (in Chinese). Science and technology press, Beijing, p. 366–369.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Northeasten Science Foundation, Inc 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Dongyan
    • 1
  • Liu Zhenmin
    • 1
  • Deng Xiaolin
    • 1
  • Xu Shaokang
    • 1
  1. 1.Geological Institute for Chemical MineralsMinistry of Chemical IndustryZhuozhouChina

Personalised recommendations