Advertisement

Annals of Microbiology

, 59:623 | Cite as

Peucedanum japonicum andCitrus unshiu essential oils inhibit the growth of antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens

  • Eun-Jin Yang
  • Sang-Suk Kim
  • Tae-Heon Oh
  • Gwanpil Song
  • Kil-Nam Kim
  • Ji-Young Kim
  • Nam Ho Lee
  • Chang-Gu Hyun
Applied Microbiology Short Communications

Abstract

In this study, the chemical compositions and the anti-bacterial activities of hydrodistilled essential oils of the whole parts ofPeucedanum japonicum and the immature fruits ofCitrus unshiu were investigated. The chemical constituents of theP. Japonicum (PJE) andCitrus unshiu (CuE) essential oils were further analyzed by GC-MS and their major components were β-pinene (66.07%) and limonene (77.93%), respectively. The antibacterial activities of PJE and CuE against drug-susceptible and -resistant skin pathogens were also examined. Anti-bacterial tests using the disk diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values indicated that PJE and CuE have excellent activities. The MIC of PJE against drug-susceptible and -resistant skin pathogens ranged from 0.13 to 5.0 μL/mL, whereas that of CuE ranged from 0.08 to 1.25 μL/mL. In addition, CuE reduced the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced secretion of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW 264.7 cells, indicating that it has anti-inflammatory effects. These findings demonstrate that PJE and CuE have great potential for use in promoting human skin health.

Key word

chemical composition essential oil Citrus unshiu Peucedanum japonicum skin pathogen 

References

  1. Baik J.S., Kim S.S., Lee J.A., Oh T.H., Kim J.Y., Lee N.H., Hyun C.G. (2008). Chemical composition and biological activities of essential oils isolated from Korean endemic Citrus species. J. Microbiol. Biotechnol., 18: 74–79.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Carson C.F, Riley T.V. (1995). Antimicrobial activity of the major components of the essential oil ofMelaleuca alternifolia. J. Appl. Bacteriol., 78: 264–269.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Costa E.V., Teixeira S.D., Marques F.A., Duarte M.C., Delarmelina C., Pinheiro M.L., Trigo J.R., Sales Maia B.H. (2008). Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of the Amazon Guatteriopsis species. Phytochemistry, 69: 1895–1899.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Hisamoto M., Kikuzaki H., Nakatani N. (2004). Constituents of the leaves ofPeucedanum japonicum Thunb. and their biological activity. J. Agric. Food Chem., 52: 445–450.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Hisamoto M., Kikuzaki H., Ohigashi H., Nakatani N. (2003). Antioxidant compounds from the leaves ofPeucedanum Japonicum thunb. J. Agric. Food Chem., 51: 5255–5261.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Holland D.B., Bojar R.A., Jeremy A.H., Ingham E., Holland K.T. (2008). Microbial colonization of anin vitro model of a tissue engineered human skin equivalent-a novel approach. FEMS Microbiol. Lett., 279: 110–115.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Huong D.T., Choi H.C., Rho T.C., Lee H.S., Lee M.K., Kim Y.H. (1999). Inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase by coumarins fromPeucedanum japonicum. Arch. Pharm. Res., 22: 324–326.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Kim S.S., Baik J.S., Oh T.H., Yoon W.J., Lee N.H., Hyun C.G. (2008). Biological activities of KoreanCitrus Obovoidea andCitrus natsudaidai essential oils against acne-inducing bacteria. Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 72: 2507–2513.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Kelen M., Tepe B. (2007). Chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of the essential oils of three Salvia species from Turkish flora. Bioresour Technol., 99: 4096–4104.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Lee J.W., Roh T.C., Rho M.C., Kim Y.K., Lee H.S. (2002). Mechanisms of relaxant action of a pyranocoumarin fromPeucedanum japonicum in isolated rat thoracic aorta. Planta Med., 68: 891–895.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Lee S.O., Choi S.Z., Lee J.H., Chung S.H., Park S.H., Kang H.C., Yang E.Y., Cho H.J., Lee K.R. (2004). Antidiabetic coumarin and cyclitol compounds fromPeucedanum japonicum. Arch. Pharm. Res., 27: 1207–1210.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Lis-Balchin M., Deans S.G. (1997). Bioactivity of selected plant essential oils againstListeria monocytogenes, J. Appl. Bacteriol., 82: 759–762.Google Scholar
  13. Malhotra S., Suri S., Tuli R. (2009) Antioxidant activity of citrus cultivars and chemical composition ofCitrus karma essential oil. Planta Med., 75: 62–64.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Mandalari G., Bennett R.N., Bisignano G., Trombetta D., Saija A., Faulds C.B., Gasson M.J., Narbad A. (2007) Antimicrobial activity of flavonoids extracted from bergamot (Citrus bergamia Risso) peel, a byproduct of the essential oil industry. J. Appl. Microbiol., 103: 2056–2064.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Morioka T., Suzui M., Nabandith V., Inamine M., Aniya Y., Nakayama T., Ichiba T., Mori H., Yoshimi N. (2004). The modifying effect ofPeucedanum japonicum, a herb in the Ryukyu Islands, on azoxymethane-induced colon preneoplastic lesions in male F344 rats. Cancer Lett., 205: 133–141.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Papadopoulos C.J., Carson C.F., Hammer K.A., Riley T.V. (2006). Susceptibility of pseudomonads toMelaleuca Alternifolia (tea tree) oil and components. J. Antimicrob. Chemother., 58: 449–451.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Tepe B., Donmez E., Unlu M., Candan F., Daferera D., Vardar-unlu G., Polissiou M., Sokmen A. (2004). Antimicrobial and antioxidative activities of the essential oils and methanol extracts ofSalvia cryptantha (Montbret et Aucher ex Benth.) andSalvia Multicaulis (Vahl). Food Chem., 84: 519–525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Tepe B., Sokmen M., Sokmen A., Daferera D., Polissiou M. (2005). Antimicrobial and antioxidative activity of the essential oil and various extracts ofCyclotrichium origanifolium (Labill.) Manden. & Scheng. J. Food Eng., 69: 335–342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Vukovic N., Milosevic T., Sukdolak S., Solujic S. (2007). Antimicrobial activities of essential oil and methanol extract ofTeucrium montanum. Evid. Based Complement. Alternat. Med., 4: 17–20.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Walsh C., Fanning S. (2008). Antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens — a cause for concern? Curr. Drug Targets, 9: 808–815.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Yajima I., Yanai T., Nakamura M., Hayashi K. (1979) Compositions of the volatiles of peel oil and juice fromCitrus unshiu. Agric. Biol. Chem., 43: 259–264.Google Scholar
  22. Yoon W.J., Kim S.S., Oh T.H., Lee N.H., Hyun C.G. (2009).Cryptomeria japonica essential oil inhibits the growth of drug-resistant skin pathogens and LPS-induced nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Pol. J. Microbiol., 58: 61–68.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© University of Milan and Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eun-Jin Yang
    • 1
  • Sang-Suk Kim
    • 2
  • Tae-Heon Oh
    • 2
  • Gwanpil Song
    • 1
  • Kil-Nam Kim
    • 1
  • Ji-Young Kim
    • 1
  • Nam Ho Lee
    • 2
  • Chang-Gu Hyun
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Group for Cosmetic Materials, Jeju Biodiversity Research Institute (JBRI)Jeju High-Tech Development Institute (HiDI)JejuKorea
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryCheju National UniversityJejuKorea

Personalised recommendations