Wetlands

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 41–48 | Cite as

A review of wildlife changes in southern bottomland hardwoods due to forest management practices

  • T. Bently Wigley
  • Thoams H. Roberts
Article

Abstract

One function of bottomland hardwood forests is provision of wildlife diversity and abundance. In this paper, we discuss the temporal and spatial changes in wildlife diversity and abundance often associated with forest management practices in bottomland hardwoods. Forest management activities after forest composition, structure, and spatial hetereogeneity, thereby changing the composition, abundance, and diversity of wildlife communities. Special habitat features such as snags, den trees, and dead and down woody material also may be impacted by forestry practices. More research is needed to fully understand landscape-level impacts of forest management.

Key Words

amphibians birds bottomland hardwoods forest management literature review mammals reptiles timber harvesting wildlife 

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Copyright information

© Society of Wetland Scientists 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Bently Wigley
    • 1
  • Thoams H. Roberts
    • 2
  1. 1.National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Inc. Dept. of Aquaculture, Fisheries, and WildlifeClemson UniversityClemson
  2. 2.Dept. of BiologyTennessee Technological UniversityCookeville

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