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Tracer techniques in plant pathology

  • S. Suryanarayanan
Article
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Abstract

Isotope techniques have been valuable in understanding many fundamental aspects of plant disease, particularly these caused by obligate parasites like rusts and mildews. Autoradiography, microautoradiography and other tracer techniques have thrown considerable light on the mobilization of materials to the infection court, shifts in metabolic pathways, RNA and protein synthesis in the host-parasite complex as well as on the metabolic machinery of uredospores. The present article summarizes current knowledge on obligate parasitism gained through tracer techniques.

Keywords

Stem Rust Rust Fungus Glyoxylate Cycle Tracer Technique Wheat Stem Rust 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Suryanarayanan
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Botany LaboratoryMadras-5

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