New Generation Computing

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 51–66 | Cite as

Sequential Prolog machine PEK

  • Yukio Kaneda
  • Naoyuki Tamura
  • Koichi Wada
  • Hideo Matsuda
  • Shumin Kuo
  • Sadao Maekawa
Regular Papers

Abstract

The sequential Prolog machine PEK currently under development is described. PEK is an experimental machine designed for high speed execution of Prolog programs. The PEK machine is controlled by horizontal-type microinstructions. The machine includes bit slice microprocessor elements comprising a microprogram sequencer and ALU, and possesses hardware circuits for unification and backtracking. The PEK machine consists of a host processor (MC68000) and a backend processor (PEK engine). A Prolog interpreter has been developed on the machine and the machine performance evaluated. A single inference can be executed in 89 microinstructions, and execution speed is approximately 60–70 KLIPS.

Keywords

Prolog Prolog Machine Microprogram Personal Workstation 

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References

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Copyright information

© Ohmsha, Ltd. and Springer 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yukio Kaneda
    • 1
  • Naoyuki Tamura
    • 1
  • Koichi Wada
    • 1
  • Hideo Matsuda
    • 1
  • Shumin Kuo
    • 1
  • Sadao Maekawa
    • 1
  1. 1.The Graduate School of Science and TechnologyKobe UniversityKobe, HyogoJapan

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