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Can instructional technology enhance the way we teach students and teachers?

  • Dina Brown
Article

Abstract

THIS ARTICLE SYNTHESIZES RESEARCH on technology integration in education with specific attention to the effects of computer-mediated environments on cognitive development, technology utilization in schools, and infusing technology in pre-service teacher education. The article identifies inadequate teacher preparation as the critical factor constraining effective technology deployment in schools and summarizes main ideas for transforming teacher-education institutions into 21st Century learning environments

Key words

instructional technology curriculum change and development computers and teacher education technology integration new technologies 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dina Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationArgosy University/Orange CountySanta Ana

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