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Journal of Plant Biology

, Volume 42, Issue 4, pp 279–286 | Cite as

Plant distribution in relation to soil properties of reclaimed lands on the West Coast of Korea

  • Byeong Mee Min
  • Joon -Ho Kim
Article

Abstract

Plant species distribution was studied on five reclaimed lands and one intertidal flat (control) on the western coast of Korea. Nineteen soil properties were analyzed. Of these, soil moisture, electrical conductivity, and levels of Na and Cl had the greatest effect on plant distribution. The plant species were divided into four groups, according to the amount of soil moisture found at their habitats.Triglochin maritimum andTypha angustata were found on the wettest sites;Phragmites communis, Carex scabrifolia, Suaeda japonica, Zoysia sinica, andSalicornia herbacea in places with relatively high moisture;Aster tripolium andPhacelurus latifolius in areas with medium levels of moisture; andAtriplex subcordata, Chenopodium virgatum, andTrifolium repens in the driest areas. The species also were divided into four groups, according to the degree of soil electrical conductivity: Highest,S. herbacea, Limonium tetragonum, Suaeda asparagoides, andS. japonica; Relatively high,A. tripolium, C. scabrifolia, P. communis, Artemisia scoparia, andZ sinka; Relatively low,Setaria viridis, C. virgatum, Sonchus brachyotus, A. subcordata, Calamagrostis epigeios, andT. angustata; and Lowest,Imperata cylindrica var.koenigii, Aeschynomene indica, Lotus corniculatus var.japonicus, andT. repens. On reclaimed land, plant species were found in zones, according to the degree of desalinization (i.e., levels of Na and Cl).

Keywords

Desalinization Electrical conductivity Moisture content Reclaimed land Soil properties 

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Copyright information

© The Botanical Society of Korea 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Science EducationDankook UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Department of BiologySeoul UniversitySeoulKorea

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