Women’s labour force participation in Australia: Recent research findings

  • M. D. R. Evans
Review article

Acknowledgements

Alas, the great mortality declines of the twentieth century do not spare all of us an early death. I should like to dedicate this article to the memory of Clifford C. Clogg who always sought to bridge the ‘accounting’ and ‘life course’ schools of demography with innovative and insightful analyses of the labour force and whose untimely death grieves his colleagues and impoverishes the field. May others as staunchly take up the torch in the pursuit of knowledge.

Keywords

Labour Force Participation Gender Role Attitude Research School Postwar Period International Social Survey Programme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. D. R. Evans
    • 1
  1. 1.International Survey Program, Research School of Social SciencesThe Australian National UniversityCanberra

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