Advertisement

Endocrine

, Volume 3, Issue 5, pp 323–326 | Cite as

Effects of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone on luteal development in hypophysectomized ewes

  • J. L. Juengel
  • T. M. Nett
  • T. R. Tandeski
  • D. C. Eckery
  • H. R. Sawyer
  • G. D. Niswender
Paper

Abstract

To test the hypothesis that growth hormone (GH) as well as luteinizing hormone (LH) is required for normal luteal growth and function, 16 western range ewes were hypophysectomized (HPX) on day 5 of the estrous cycle. Ewes were randomly assigned to receive saline (S), LH, GH, or LH + GH (n=4 per group) from the time of HPX until collection of corpora lutea 7 days after HPX (day 12). Corpora lutea were also collected from pituitary-intact ewes on days 5 (day 5 control,n=4) and 12 (day 12 control,n=4) of the estrous cycle. To assess luteal function, concentrations of progesterone in sera, luteal weights and luteal concentrations of mRNA encoding cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5,Δ4 isomerase (3β-HSD) were determined. Concentrations of progesterone in sera and luteal weights increased between days 5 and 12 of the estrous cycle in control ewes, but not in HPX + S ewes. In HPX ewes treated with LH, concentrations of progesterone in sera and luteal mRNA for P450scc and 3β-HSD increased but luteal weights were unaffected. Treatment with GH increased luteal weight and luteal concentrations of mRNA encoding P450scc but did not increase concentrations of mRNA encoding 3β-HSD compared to HPX + S ewes. Concentrations of progesterone in sera of GH-treated, HPX ewes were similar to those of day 12 control ewes but not significantly different from those in HPX + S ewes. Treatment of HPX ewes with LH + GH increased all parameters of luteal function measured to values similar to those in day 12 controls. In conclusion, both GH and LH are necessary for normal luteal development in the ewe.

Keywords

Luteal development growth hormone luteinizing hormone sheep 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adashi, E.Y., Resnick, C.E., Hernandez, E.R., May, J.V., Knecht, M., Svoboda, M.J., & VanWyk, J.J. (1988).Endocrinology,122, 1583–1591.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Amselgruber, W., Sinowatz, F., Schams, D. & Skottner, A. (1994).J. Reprod. Fert.,101, 445–451.Google Scholar
  3. Badley, J.E., Bishop, G.A., St John, T. & Frelinger, J.A. (1988).Bio techniques,6, 114–116.Google Scholar
  4. Braden, T.D., Manns, J.G., Cermak, D.L., Nett, T.M. & Niswender, G.D. (1986).Theriogenology,25, 833–843.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Clarke, I.J., Cummins, J.T. & deKrester, D.M. (1983).Neuroendocrinology,36, 376–384.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Davis, S.L. (1972).Endocrinology,91, 549–555.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Davis, S.L., Reichert L.E. Jr, & Niswender, G.D. (1971).Biol. Reprod.,4, 145–153.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Diekman, M.A., O’Callaghan, P., Nett, T.M. & Niswender, G.D. (1978).Biol. Reprod.,19, 999–1009.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Duddleson, W.G., Midgley A.R. Jr, & Niswender, G.D. (1972).Computers Biomed. Res.,5, 205–217.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Eckery, D.C., Moeller, C.L., Nett, T.M. & Sawyer, H.R. (1994).J. Anim. Sci.,72, 2425–2430.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Einspanier, R., Miyamoto, A., Schams, D., Muller, M. & Brem, G. (1990).J. Reprod. Fert.,90, 439–445.Google Scholar
  12. Farin, C.E., Nett, T.M. & Niswender, G.D. (1990).J. Reprod. Fert.,88, 61–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Feinberg, A.P. & Volelstein, B. (1983).Anal. Biochem.,132, 6–13.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Hamernick, D.L. & Nett, T.M. (1988).Endocrinology,122, 959–966.Google Scholar
  15. John, M.E., John, M.C., Ashley, P., MacDonald, R.J., Simpson, E.R. & Waterman, M.R. (1984).Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA,81, 5628–5632.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Juengel, J.L., Guy, M.K., Tandeski, T.R., McGuire, W.J. & Niswender, G.D. (1994).Biol. Reprod.,51, 380–384.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Lorence, M.C., Murray, B.A., Trant, J.M. & Mason, J.I. (1990).Endocrinology,126, 2493–2498.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Lucy, M.C., Byatt, J.C., Curran, T.L., Curran, D.F. & Collier, R.J. (1994).Biol. Reprod.,50, 1136–1144.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Lucy, M.C., Collier, R.J., Kitchell, M.L., Dibner, J.J., Hauser, S.D. & Krivi, G.G. (1993).Biol. Reprod.,48, 1219–1227.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Lucy, M.C., Thatcher, W.W., Savio, J.D., Danet-Desnoyers, G, Moser, M.T., Badingo, L., Simmen, F.A. & Collier, R.J. (1992).J. Anim. Sci.,70 (suppl 1), 271 (abstract 528).Google Scholar
  21. Niswender, G.D. (1973).Steroids,22, 413–424.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Niswender, G.D., Farin, C.E., Gamboni, F., Sawyer, H.R. & Nett, T.M. (1986).J. Anim. Sci.,62 (Suppl 2), 1–13.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Niswender, G.D., Reichert L.E. Jr,, Midgley A.R. Jr, & Nalbandov, A.V. (1969).Endocrinology,84, 1166–1173.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Parmer, T.G., Roberts C.T. Jr, LeRoith, D., Adashi, E.Y., Khan, 2I., Solan, N. Nelson, S., Zilberstein, M. & Gibori, G. (1991).Endocrinology,129, 2924–2932.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Reimers, T.J., McCann, J.P. & Cowan, R.J. (1983).J. Anim. Sci.,57. 683–691.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E.F. & Maniatis, T. (1989).Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd ed. Coldspring Harbor Laboratory Press: Coldspring Harbor NY.Google Scholar
  27. SAS User’s Guide: Statistics (1987). SAS Institute, Inc: Cary, NC.Google Scholar
  28. Scatchard, G. (1949).Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci.,51, 660–672.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Smith, M.F., McIntush, E.W. & Smith, G.W. (1994).J. Anim. Sci.,72, 1857–1872.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Juengel
    • 1
  • T. M. Nett
    • 1
  • T. R. Tandeski
    • 1
  • D. C. Eckery
    • 1
  • H. R. Sawyer
    • 1
  • G. D. Niswender
    • 1
  1. 1.Animal Reproduction & Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of PhysiologyColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

Personalised recommendations