Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia

, Volume 45, Issue 7, pp 692–698 | Cite as

Lidocaine prolongs the safe duration of circulatory arrest during deep hypothermia in dogs

  • Yuan Zhou
  • Dongxin Wang
  • Minyi Du
  • Jianghua Zhu
  • Guojin Shan
  • Daqing Ma
  • Dajian Xie
  • Qiong Ma
  • Xiaohua Hu
  • Jun Li
Laboratory Report

Abstract

Purpose

To test the hypothesis that lidocaine prolongs the safe period of circulatory arrest during deep hypothermia.

Methods

Sixteen dogs were subjected to cooling, first surface cooling to 30°C and then core cooling to 20°C rectal temperature). The circulation was then stopped for 90 min. In the lidocaine group, 4 mg·kg−1 lidocaine was injected into the oxygenator two minutes before circulatory arrest and 2 mg·kg−1 at the beginning of reperfusion and rewarming. The control group received equivalent volumes of normal saline. Post-operatively, using a neurological deficit scoring system (maximum deficit score — 100; minimum — zero indicating that no scored deficit could be detected). Neurological function was evaluated hourly for six hours and then daily for one week. the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using one compartment model.

Results

On the seventh day, the neurological deficit score and overall performance were better in the lidocaine (0.83 ± 2.04) than in the control group (8.33 ± 4.08P < 0.05). During the experiment, the base excess values were also better in the lidocaine than in the control group (at 30 min reperfusion: −4.24 ± 1.30vs −8.20 ± 2.82P < 0.01, at 60 min reperfusion was −3.34 ± 1.87vs −7.52 ± 2.40 (P < 0.01). On the eighth day the extent of pathological changes were milder in the lidocaine group than that in the control group. The elimination half life of lidocaine was 40.44 ± 7.99 during hypothermia and 2.01 ± 4.56 during rewarming.

Conclusions

In dogs lidocaine prolongs the safe duration of circulatory arrest during hypothermia.

Résumé

Objectif

Vérifier l’hypothèse qui veut que la lidocaïne prolonge la période sans risque d’arrêt circulatoire sous hypothermie profonde.

Méthode

Seize chiens ont été soumis à un refroidissement, externe d’abord jusqu’à 30 °C, puis interne jusqu’à une température rectale de 20 °C. La circulation a été arrêtée ensuite pendant 90 min. Dans le groupe ayant reçu de la lidocaïne, 4 mg×kg−1 de lidocaïne ont été injectés dans l’oxygénateur deux minutes avant l’arrêt de la circulation et 2 mg×kg−1 au début de la reperfusion et du réchauffement. Le groupe témoin a reçu des quantités équivalentes de solution salée. Après l’intervention, au moyen d’un système de cotation du déficit neurologique (déficit maximal — 100; minimal — zéro, indiquant qu’aucune baisse n’a été détectée dans cette échelle de cotation), la fonction neurologique a été évaluée à toutes les heures pendant six heures et, par la suite, à chaque jour pendant une semaine. Les paramètres pharmacocinétiques ont été calculés avec l’emploi d’un modèle monocompartimental.

Résultats

Le septième jour, la cotation du déficit neurologique et le rendement global ont été meilleurs dans le groupe avec la lidocaïne (0,83 ± 2,04) que dans le groupe témoin (8,33 ± 4,08P < 0,05). Pendant l’expérience, les valeurs de l’excès basique ont aussi été meilleures dans le groupe avec lidocaïne que dans le groupe témoin (30 min. après le début de la reperfusion: −4,24 ± 1,30vs −8,20 ± 2,82P < 0,01; à 60 min. −3,34 ± 1,87vs −7,52 ± 2,40P < 0,01). Le huitième jour, l’étendue des changements pathologiques a été moins importante toujours dans le groupe avec lidocaïne. La demi-vie d’élimination de la lidocaïne était de 40,44 ± 7,99 pendant l’hypothermie et de 2,01 ± 4,56 pendant le réchauffement.

Conclusion

Chez les chiens soumis à une hypothermie, la lidocaïne prolonge la période sans risque d’arrêt circulatoire.

References

  1. 1.
    Strichartz G. Molecular mechanisms of nerve block by local anesthetics. Anesthesiology 1976; 45: 421–41.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Sakabe T, Maekawa T, Ishikawa T, Takeshita H. The effects of lidocaine on canine cerebral metabolism and circulation related to the electroencephalogram. Anesthesiology 1974; 40: 433–41.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Zhou Y, Wu X, Du M. The protecting effects of lidocaine on brain schemia. (Chinese) Chinese Journal of Anesthesiology 1985; 5: 193–5.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Li L-H, Zhou Y, Su Y. The protecting effects of lidocaine on acute incomplete brain ischemia. (Chinese) Chinese Journal of Anesthesiology 1992; 12: 70–2.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Astrup J, Skovsted S, Gjerris F, Sørensen HR. Increase in extracellular potassium in the brain during circulatory arrest: effects of hypothermia, lidocaine, and thiopental. Anesthesiology 1981; 55: 256–62.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Astrup J, Sørensen PM, Sørensen HR. Inhibition of cerebral oxygen and glucose consumption in the dog by hypothermia, pentobarbital, and lidocaine. Anesthesiology 1981; 55: 263–8.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    D’Alecy LG, Lundy EF, Barton KJ, Zelenock GB. Dextrose containing intravenous fluid impairs outcome and increases death after eight minutes of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in dogs. Surgery 1986; 100: 505–11.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Mills NL, Ochsner JL. Massive air embolism during cardiopulmonary bypass. Causes, prevention, and management. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1980; 80: 708–17.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Xei D-J, Liu Y-P, Xie R. The determination of lidocaine, bubivacaine and dicaine in plasma chromastographycally. (Chinese) Journal of Beijing Medical University 1986; 18: 275–7.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Yang Y-H, Jiang Z-F, Hu Z-Y. The method of the determination of lactate by using national product of enzymologic agent. (Chinese) Chinese Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences 1983; 6: 141–5.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Passey RB, Gillum RL, Fuller JB, Urry FM, Giles ML. Evaluation and comparison of 10 glucose methods and the reference method recommended in the proposed product class standard (1974). Clin Chem 1977; 23: 131–8.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Zhou Y, Du M, Ma Q, Xie R, Ma S, Zhong Y-F. A study of dose-effect relationship of the protecting effect of lidocaine on brain cells against global ischemia and ultrastracteral changes of brain cells. (Chinese) Chinese Journal of Anesthesiology 1987; 7: 193–5.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Shi W-Z, Zhang L-L, Xie D-J, Xie R. A study of bioutility of lidocaine during epidural block. (Chinese) Chinese Journal of Anesthesiology 1993; 13: 163–5.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Zhou Y, Xu X, Jin Z-Q, Xei R. Tritiated lidocaine tracing study in anoxic brain. (Chinese) Chinese Journal of Anesthesiology 1989; 9: 7–8.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Bai Y, Zhu J-H, Mong Y, Shi W-Z, Xie R. The effects of N2O inhalation anesthesia on lactate leuel in blood. (Chinese) Chinese Journal Anesthesiology 1994; 14: 269–71.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Canadian Anesthesiologists 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuan Zhou
    • 1
  • Dongxin Wang
    • 1
  • Minyi Du
    • 1
  • Jianghua Zhu
    • 1
  • Guojin Shan
    • 1
  • Daqing Ma
    • 1
  • Dajian Xie
    • 1
  • Qiong Ma
    • 1
  • Xiaohua Hu
    • 1
  • Jun Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Anesthesiology, Department of Anesthesiology, First HospitalBeijing Medical UniversityBeijingChina

Personalised recommendations