Canadian Anaesthetists’ Society Journal

, Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 129–135 | Cite as

Reversal by acupuncture of cardiovascular depression induced with morphine during halothane anaesthesia in dogs

  • Do Chil Lee
  • Donald H. Clifford
  • Myung O. Lee
  • Leonard Nelson
Article

Abstract

The cardiovascular effects of morphine sulphate and/or acupuncture by means of electrocautery at Jen Chung (Go-26) were studied in 35 dogs. All animals were maintained under anaesthesia with halothane 0.75 per cent supplemented by the intravenous administration of succinylcholine to allow controlled ventilation during a two hour period of monitoring. Cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, central venous pressure, total peripheral resistance, [H+] (pH) PaC02, Pa02 and base deficit were measured in each dog.

Morphine 0.5 mg ·kg-1, administered alone as a single bolus, significantly (P < 0.05) decreased cardiac output, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and significantly increased stroke volume and pulse pressure in dogs under halothane anaesthesia. Acupuncture by electrocautery alone induced a significant increase in cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate, mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure with a significant decrease in total peripheral resistance following halothane. Acupuncture at Jen Chung (Go-26) for 10 minutes following the intravenous administration of morphine caused a significant increase in cardiac output, heart rate and mean arterial pressure with a significant decrease in central venous pressure and total peripheral resistance during halothane anaesthesia.

The depressant effect of morphine on cardiac output, heart rate and mean arterial pressure in dogs under halothane anaesthesia appears to be reversed by acupuncture by electrocautery at Jen Chung (Go-26). Stimulation of this acupuncture locus could be helpful in resuscitating patients whose cardiovascular system is depressed by morphine and/or halothane anaes-thesia.

Key Words

Acupuncture Reversal of cardiovascular depression 

Ré SUMé

Les effets cardiovascutaires du sulfate de morphine et, ou de l’acupuncture é lectrique au point de Jen Chung (Go-26, point situé entre la lèvre supérieure et la base du nez) ont fait l’objet de cette é tude effectué e chez le chien. A cet effet, 35 chiens ont é té anesthé sié s à l’halothane à une concentration de 0.75 pour cent et maintenus sous perfusion de succinylcholine et en respiration contrôlé e durant les deux heures de la procé dure. Les paramètres mesuré s é taient le débit et la fré quence cardiaque, le volume d’é jection, la pression arté rielle moyenne et la pression diffé rentielle, la pression veineuse centrale et la ré sistance pé riphé rique ainsi que la [H+] (pH), la Paco2 la Pao2 et le “base excess”. La morphine, seule, administré e en bolus intraveneuse à la dose de 0.5 mg·kg-1 produisait une diminution significative (p < .05) du dé bit cardiaque, de la fré quence cardiaque et de la pression arté rielle moyenne et une augmentation significative du volume d’é jection et de la ré sistance pé riphé rique totale de chiens anesthé sié s à l’halothane. L’acupuncture é lectrique, seule, administré e durant dix minutes amenait une augmentation significative du dé bit cardiaque, du volume d’é jection, de la fré quence cardiaque, de la pression arté rielle moyenne et de la pression diffé rentielle avec une diminution significative de la ré sistance pé riphé rique totale. L’acupuncture é lectrique administré e durant dix minutes au point de Jen Chung après l’administration intraveineuse de sulfate de morphine causait une augmentation significative du dé bit et de la fré quence cardiaque, et de la pression arté rielle moyenne, avec une diminution significative de la pression veineuse centrale et de la ré sistance pé riphé rique chez les chiens anesthé sié s à l’halothane.

Les effets dé presseurs produits par la morphine sur le dé bit cardiaque, la fré quence cardiaque et la pression arté rielle moyenne de chiens anesthé sié s à l’halothane semblent donc renversé s par l’administration d’acupuncture é lectrique au point de Jen Chung (Go-26). La stimulation de ce point d’acupuncture pourrait être utile dans la ré animation de malades au système cardiovasculaire dé primé par la morphine ou une anesthé sie à l’halothane.

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Copyright information

© Canadian Anesthesiologists 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Do Chil Lee
    • 1
  • Donald H. Clifford
    • 2
    • 3
  • Myung O. Lee
    • 2
  • Leonard Nelson
    • 4
  1. 1.Departments of Anesthesia and PhysiologyMedical College of OhioToledoUSA
  2. 2.Division of Laboratory Animal MedicineMedical College of OhioToledoUSA
  3. 3.Department of AnatomyMedical College of OhioToledoUSA
  4. 4.Department of PhysiologyMedical College of OhioToledoUSA

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