Low levels of awareness of suboptimal health conditions in a high-risk working population: The “better health for better Hong Kong” health promotion campaign

  • Gary T. C. Ko
  • Juliana C. N. Chan
  • Stanley S. C. Hui
  • Amy W. Y. Chan
  • Patrick T. S. Wong
  • Spencer D. Y. Tong
  • Ferrie Chow
  • Cecilia L. W. Chan
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF03004170

Cite this article as:
Ko, G.T.C., Chan, J.C.N., Hui, S.S.C. et al. Int. J. Behav. Med. (2007) 14: 63. doi:10.1007/BF03004170

Abstract

The incidences of cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and diabetes are rising in many Asian populations. In April 2000, a 5-year territory-wide health promotion campaign supported by Li Ka Shing Foundation was launched in Hong Kong by the Health InfoWorld of Hospital Authority. From the general working class, 4,832 Chinese people were randomly recruited into this campaign. There were 2,370 men (49.0%) and 2,462 women (51.0%; median age = 43.0 years, range = 17-83 years). Of these, 37.5% were obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 or waist circumference ≥80 cm in women and ≥90 cm in men), 22.3% had hypertension, 11.6% were smokers, 31.0% had hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol ≥5.2 mmol/l), 2.2% had diabetes, and 0.7% had a past history of cardiovascular disease. There were 1,338 participants (27.7%)who had 2 ormore risk factors (more men than women: 36.9% vs. 18.9%,p < .001). Despite this high prevalence of multiple risk factors, most (83.1%) perceived their health status as satisfactory (more men than women: 85.6% vs. 80.7%, p < .001). In conclusion, the combination of high prevalence of multiple risk factors and low levels of awareness of their suboptimal health status herald a looming epidemic of life-threatening diseases in a group of middle-aged Hong Kong people. Massive public education is an important and essential, although it may not be self-sufficient, factor to reduce the socioeconomic impacts of this epidemic.

Key words

awareness cardiovascular disease risk factors Hong Kong Chinese 

Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary T. C. Ko
    • 1
  • Juliana C. N. Chan
    • 2
  • Stanley S. C. Hui
    • 2
  • Amy W. Y. Chan
    • 3
  • Patrick T. S. Wong
    • 3
  • Spencer D. Y. Tong
    • 3
  • Ferrie Chow
    • 3
  • Cecilia L. W. Chan
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of MedicineAlice HML Nethersole HospitalJulianaHong Kong
  2. 2.the Chinese University of Hong KongHong Kong SARChina
  3. 3.Hong Kong Hospital AuthorityHong Kong SARChina
  4. 4.the University of Hong KongHong Kong SARChina

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