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Economic Botany

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 185–205 | Cite as

Microbial synthesis of riboflavin

  • Thomas G. Pridham
Technical Literature Review

Abstract

This member of the vitamin-B complex is necessary in human diet to prevent soreness of mouth, lips and nose, and inflammation of the cornea. It is commercially produced from the fungi Ashbya gossypiiand Eremothecium ashbyii,and is used to enrich various foods and animal feedstuffs.

Keywords

Fermentation Candida Riboflavin Economic Botany Flavin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1952

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas G. Pridham
    • 1
  1. 1.Fermentation DivisionNorthern Regional Research LaboratoryPeoria

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