The Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging

, Volume 12, Issue 5, pp a319–a330

Frailty, osteoporosis and hip fracture: Causes, consequences and therapeutic perspectives

  • Y. Rolland
  • G. Abellan van Kan
  • A. Benetos
  • H. Blain
  • M. Bonnefoy
  • P. Chassagne
  • C. Jeandel
  • M. Laroche
  • F. Nourhashemi
  • P. Orcel
  • F. Piette
  • C. Ribot
  • P. Ritz
  • C. Roux
  • J. Taillandier
  • F. Tremollieres
  • G. Weryha
  • B. Vellas
Geriatric Science

DOI: 10.1007/BF02982665

Cite this article as:
Rolland, Y., van Kan, G.A., Benetos, A. et al. J Nutr Health Aging (2008) 12: a319. doi:10.1007/BF02982665

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this review of the literature is to report the factors which both contribute to the frailty syndrome and increase hip fracture risk in the elderly. This work is the fruit of common reflection by geriatricians, endocrinologists, gynecologists and rheumatologists, and seeks to stress the importance of detection and management of the various components of frailty in elderly subjects who are followed and treated for osteoporosis. It also sets out to heighten awareness of the need for management of osteoporosis in the frail elderly.Design: The current literature on frailty and its links with hip fracture was reviewed and discussed by the group.Results: The factors and mechanisms which are common to both osteoporosis and frailty (falls, weight loss, sarcopenia, low physical activity, cognitive decline, depression, hormones such as testosterone, estrogens, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), growth hormone (GH), vitamin D and pro-inflammatory cytokines) were identified. The obstacles to access to diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in the frail elderly population and common therapeutic pathways for osteoporosis and frailty were discussed.Conclusion: Future research including frail subjects would improve our understanding of how management of frailty can can contribute to lower the incidence of fractures. In parallel, more systematic management of osteoporosis should reduce the risk of becoming frail in the elderly population.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag France and Serdi Éditions 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Rolland
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • G. Abellan van Kan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. Benetos
    • 4
  • H. Blain
    • 5
  • M. Bonnefoy
    • 6
  • P. Chassagne
    • 7
  • C. Jeandel
    • 5
  • M. Laroche
    • 8
  • F. Nourhashemi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • P. Orcel
    • 9
  • F. Piette
    • 10
  • C. Ribot
    • 11
    • 12
  • P. Ritz
    • 13
  • C. Roux
    • 14
  • J. Taillandier
    • 15
  • F. Tremollieres
    • 11
    • 12
  • G. Weryha
    • 16
  • B. Vellas
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Inserm U558
  2. 2.Université de Toulouse IIIToulouse
  3. 3.Gerontopôle de Toulouse
  4. 4.Centre de Gériatrie, CHU de Nancy, 1 INSERM Unité U684Université de NancyFrance
  5. 5.Pôle de Gérontologie, Centre de Prévention et de Traitement des Maladies du VieillissementCHU MontpellierMontpellier Cedex 5
  6. 6.Service de Médecine GériatriqueCHU Lyon-SudFrance
  7. 7.Service Médecine Interne GériatriqueCHU Hôpital de Bois-GuillaumeRouen Cedex
  8. 8.Service de RhumatologieCHU RangueilToulouse cedex
  9. 9.C.H.U. Lariboisière Service de RhumatologieParis
  10. 10.Hôpital Ch. Foix (Ivry)APHP, Université PM CurieFrance
  11. 11.Centre de MénopauseHôpital Paule de Viguier, CHU Toulouse31059 Toulouse cedex 9
  12. 12.Inserm U858-I2MRCHU RangueilToulouse cedex 4
  13. 13.Service de MédecineCHUAngers cedex 1
  14. 14.Hôpital Cochin 27Paris
  15. 15.Pôle Vieillissement, Réadaptation et AccompagnementAP-HP, Hôpital Universitaire Paul BrousseVillejuif
  16. 16.Vandoeuvre les NancyFrance
  17. 17.Service de Médecine Interne et de Gérontologie CliniqueHôpital La Grave-CasselarditToulouseFrance

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