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Phytoparasitica

, Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 149–152 | Cite as

An unusual isolate of turnip mosaic potyvirus fromAbutilon theophrasti in Piedmont, Italy

  • L. Guglielmone
  • C. E. Jenner
  • J. A. Walsh
  • E. Ramasso
  • D. Marian
  • P. Roggero
Note

Abstract

An isolate of the poty virus turnip mosaic virus (TuMV-Ab) showing severe mosaic symptoms inAbutilon theophrasti from Piedmont (northwestern Italy) in 1993, has been found to be of an unusual pathotype and serotype. The isolate was easily transmitted byAphyis gossiypii and Myzus persicae and was not seed-transmitted inA. Theophrasti. The host range of TuMV-Ab was different from that of another Piedmont isolate of TuMV fromAlliaria officinalis and from a TuMV isolate fromBrassica napus. TuMV-Ab was characterized using the reactions on the fourB. Napus lines S4, R4, 165 and S1 as the rare pathotype 7, found only once previously in Europe. Tests with polyclonal antisera indicated that TuMV-Ab was only distantly related to the two other TuMV isolates. Serological characterization with a panel of 30 monoclonal antibodies showed that TuMV-Ab belonged to one of the less common serotypes (JPN).

Key Words

Turnip mosaic virus potyvirus Abutilon theophrasti weed pathotype serotype Brassicaceae 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Guglielmone
    • 1
  • C. E. Jenner
    • 2
  • J. A. Walsh
    • 2
  • E. Ramasso
    • 1
  • D. Marian
    • 1
  • P. Roggero
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Fitovirologia ApplicataCNRTorinoItaly
  2. 2.Horticulture Research InternationalWellesbourneUK

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