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Archives of Pharmacal Research

, 28:1251 | Cite as

Cytoprotective effect of green tea extract and quercetin against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

  • Yun -Mi Jeong
  • Yeong -Gon Choi
  • Dong -Seok Kim
  • Seo -Hyoung Park
  • Jin -A Yoon
  • Sun -Bang Kwon
  • Eun -Sang Park
  • Kyoung -Chan ParkEmail author
Article

Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the cytoprotective effects of antioxidative substances in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treated Mel-Ab melanocytes. Tested substances include selenium, quercetin, green tea (GT) extract, and several vitamins (ascorbic acid, Trolox, and folic acid). Of these, both quercetin and GT extract were found to have strong cytoprotective effects on H2O2-induced cell death. We also examined additive effects, but no combination of two of any of the above substances was found to act synergistically against oxidative damage in Mel-Ab cells. Nevertheless, a multi-combination of GT extract, quercetin, and folic acid appeared to prevent cellular damage in a synergistic manner, which suggests that combinations of antioxidants may be of importance, and that co-treatment with antioxidants offers a possible means of treating vitiligo, which is known to be related to melanocyte oxidative stress.

Key words

Oxidative stress Reactive oxygen species Cytoprotection Antioxidant, Vitiligo 

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Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yun -Mi Jeong
    • 1
    • 4
  • Yeong -Gon Choi
    • 1
    • 4
  • Dong -Seok Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Seo -Hyoung Park
    • 1
  • Jin -A Yoon
    • 1
  • Sun -Bang Kwon
    • 3
  • Eun -Sang Park
    • 1
  • Kyoung -Chan Park
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of DermatologySeoul National University College of MedicineKorea
  2. 2.Research Division for Human Life SciencesSeoul National UniversitySeoulKorea
  3. 3.Welskin Co. Ltd.SeoulKorea
  4. 4.Department of DermatologySeoul National University Bundang HospitalKyounggi-DoKorea

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