Archives of Pharmacal Research

, Volume 25, Issue 6, pp 860–864 | Cite as

Antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of some essential oils

  • Buket Cicioğlu Andoğan
  • Hasan Baydar
  • Selçuk Kaya
  • Mustafa Demirci
  • Demir Özbaşar
  • Ethem Mumcu
Research Articles Article

Abstract

In this study the composition and antimicrobial properties of essential oils obtained fromOriganum onites, Mentha piperita, Juniperus exalsa, Chrysanthemum indicum, Lavandula hybrida, Rosa damascena, Echinophora tenuifolia, Foeniculum vulgare were examined. To evaluate thein vitro antibacterial activities of these eight aromatic extracts; theirin vitro antimicrobial activities were determined by disk diffusion testing, according to the NCCLS criteria.Escherichia coli (ATTC 25922J,Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) andPseudomonas aeruginosa (ATTC 27853 were used as standard test bacterial strains.Origanum onites recorded antimicrobial activity against all test bacteria, and was strongest againstStaphylococcus aureus. ForRosa damascena, Mentha piperita andLavandula hybrida antimicrobial activity was recorded only toStaphylococcus aureus. Juniperus exalsa, and Chrysanthemum indicum exhibited antibacterial activities against bothStaphylococcus aureus andEscherichia coli. We also examined thein vitro antimicrobial activities of some components of the essential oils and found some components with antimicrobial activity.

Key words

Antimicrobial activity Essential oils Chemical composition Disk diffusion Capillary Gas Chromatography Plant extracts 

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Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Buket Cicioğlu Andoğan
    • 1
  • Hasan Baydar
    • 2
  • Selçuk Kaya
    • 1
  • Mustafa Demirci
    • 1
  • Demir Özbaşar
    • 3
  • Ethem Mumcu
    • 3
  1. 1.Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology Department, Faculty of MedicineSüleyman Demirel UniversityIspartaTurkey
  2. 2.Faculty of AgricultureSüleyman Demirel UniversityIspartaTurkey
  3. 3.Medical DoctorSüleyman Demirel UniversityIspartaTurkey

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