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Intestinal bacterial β-glucuronidase activity of patients with colon cancer

  • Dong-Hyun Kim
  • Young-Ho Jin
Research Article Pharmacology, Toxicology & Pharmaceutics

Abstract

The fecal β-glucuronidase activity of patients with colon cancer and healthy controls were measured to determine the relationship between the fluctuation of intestinal bacterial β-glucuronidase and colon cancer. The fecal β-glucuronidase activity of patients with colon cancer was 1.7 times higher than that of the healthy controls. However, when these fecal specimens were sonicated, the enzyme activity of patients with colon cancer was 12.1 times higher than that of the healthy controls. The fecal β-glucuronidase activity of human intestinal bacteria was drastically induced by its substrate or the bile secreted after a subcutaneous injection of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and benzo[a]pyrene into rats. DMH-and benzo[a]pyrene-treated biles induced β-glucuronidase activity in the human intestinal microflora by approximately 1.5- and 2.3-fold, respectively. They also induced β-glucuronidase inE. coli HGU-3, which is a β-glucuronidase-producing bacterium from the human intestine. D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone similarly inhibited fecal β-glucuronidase in several patients with colon cancer in addition to the healthy controls. This suggests that potent β-glucuronidase activity is a prime factor in the etiology of colon cancer.

Key words

Colon cancer β-Clucuronidase Intestinal bacteria 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine 

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Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of PharmacyKyung Hee UniversitySeoulKorea

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