Archives of Pharmacal Research

, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 147–152 | Cite as

Synthesis andin vitro cytotoxicity of cinnamaldehydes to human solid tumor cells

  • Byoung-Mog Kwon
  • Seung-Ho Lee
  • Sang Un Choi
  • Sung Hee Park
  • Chong Ock Lee
  • Young-Kwon Cho
  • Nack-Do Sung
  • Song-Hae Bok
Research Articles

Abstract

Cinnamaldehydes and related compounds were synthesized from various cinnamic acids based on the 2′-hydroxycinnamaldehyde isolated from the bark ofCinnamomum cassia Blume. The cytotoxicity to human solid tumor cells such as A549, SK-OV-3, SK-MEL-2, XF498 and HCT15 were measured. Cinnamic acid, cinnamates and cinnamyl alcohols did not show any cytotoxicity against the human tumor cells. Cinnamaldehydes and realted compounds were resistant to A549 cell line up to 15 μg/ml. In contrast, HCT15 and SK-MEL-2 cells were much sensitive to these cinnamaldehyde analogues which showed ED50 values 0.63-8.1 μg/ml. Cytotoxicity of the saturated aldehydes was much weak compared to their unsaturated aldehydes. From these studies, it was found that the key functional group of the cinnamaldehyde-related compounds in the antitumor activity is the propenal group.

Key words

Cinnamaldehyde Human tumor cell Cytotoxicity Cinnamomum cassia 

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Copyright information

© The Pharmaceutical Society of Korea 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Byoung-Mog Kwon
    • 1
  • Seung-Ho Lee
    • 1
  • Sang Un Choi
    • 3
  • Sung Hee Park
    • 3
  • Chong Ock Lee
    • 3
  • Young-Kwon Cho
    • 2
  • Nack-Do Sung
    • 2
  • Song-Hae Bok
    • 1
  1. 1.Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & BiotechnologyProtein Regulator RUTaejonKorea
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural ChemistryChoongnam National UniversityTaejonKorea
  3. 3.Pharmaceutical Screening Lab.Korea Research Institute of Chemical TechnologyTaejonKorea

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