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Breast Cancer

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 26–32 | Cite as

Analysis of gene expression involved in brain metastasis from breast cancer using cDNA microarray

  • Itaru Nishizuka
  • Takashi Ishikawa
  • Yohei Hamaguchi
  • Masako Kamiyama
  • Yasushi Ichikawa
  • Koji Kadota
  • Rika Miki
  • Yasuhiro Tomaru
  • Yosuke Mizuno
  • Naoko Tominaga
  • Rieko Yano
  • Hitoshi Goto
  • Hiroyuki Nitanda
  • Shinji Togo
  • Yasushi Okazaki
  • Yoshihide Hayashizaki
  • Hiroshi Shimada
Original Article

Abstract

Background

Brain metastases occur in 15% to 30% of breast cancer patients, usually as a late event. The patterns of metastases to different organs are determined by the tumor cell phenotype and interactions between the tumor cells and the organ environment.

Methods

We investigated the gene expression profile occurring in brain metastases from a breast cancer cell line. We used cDNA microarrays to compare patterns of gene expression between the mouse breast cancer cell line Jyg MC (A) and a subline that often metastasis to brain, (B).

Results

By Microarray analysis about 350 of 21,000 genes were significantly up-regulated in Jyg MC (B). Many candidate genes that may be associated with the establishment of brain metastasis from breast cancer were included. Interestingly, we found that the expression of astrocyte derived cytokine receptors (IL-6 receptor, TGF-beta receptor and IGF receptor) were significantly increased in Jyg MC (B) cells. These results were confirmed by RT-PCR.

Conclusion

These results suggest that cytokines produced by glial cellsin vivo may contribute, in a paracrine manner, to the development of brain metastases from breast cancer cells.

Key words

cDNA Microarray Brain metastasis Breast cancer Cell line Cytokine 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Breast Cancer Society 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Itaru Nishizuka
    • 1
  • Takashi Ishikawa
    • 1
  • Yohei Hamaguchi
    • 1
  • Masako Kamiyama
    • 1
  • Yasushi Ichikawa
    • 1
  • Koji Kadota
    • 1
  • Rika Miki
    • 2
  • Yasuhiro Tomaru
    • 2
  • Yosuke Mizuno
    • 2
  • Naoko Tominaga
    • 2
  • Rieko Yano
    • 2
  • Hitoshi Goto
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Nitanda
    • 2
  • Shinji Togo
    • 1
  • Yasushi Okazaki
    • 2
  • Yoshihide Hayashizaki
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Shimada
    • 1
  1. 1.Second Department of SurgeryYokohama City University, School of MedicineJapan
  2. 2.Laboratory for Genome Exploration Research GroupRIKEN Genomic Sciences Center (GSC) and Genome Science LaboratoryJapan

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