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Contemporary Jewry

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 55–77 | Cite as

Ba’Alot teshuvah daughters and their mothers: a view from South Africa

  • Roberta G. Sands
  • Dorit Roer-Strier
Article

Keywords

Jewish Community Religious Community Contemporary JEWRY Religious Observance South African Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberta G. Sands
    • 1
  • Dorit Roer-Strier
    • 2
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaUSA
  2. 2.Hebrew University of JerusalemIsrael

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