Advertisement

Sugar Tech

, Volume 6, Issue 1–2, pp 77–80 | Cite as

Biological and chemical control of eye leaf spot disease of sugarcane

  • S. R. Sharma
  • R. K. Gaur
  • Ashutosh Singh
  • Pratibha Singh
  • G. P. RaoEmail author
Short Communication
  • 125 Downloads

Abstract

Incidence of eye leaf spot disease caused byHelminthosporium tetramera in different sugarcane varieties was recorded in Tarai belt of Uttar Pradesh during 1998–99 and 1999–2000 crop seasons in plant as well as ratoon crop. The disease incidence was more severe in plants (27.65%, 32.14%) followed by ratoons (28.40%, 44.46%) of cultivar CoS 767 in both crop seasons, respectively followed by CoS 91269 and CoS 90265. Essential oil ofCitrus sinensis and aquatic extract of garlic bulb at 2000 ppm were found to inhibit completely the mycelial growth and sporulation ofH. tetramera. However, onion bulb and eucalyptus leaf extract at 3000 ppm had also significant inhibitory effect on the fungus. Among the six fungicides testedin vitro against the pathogen, bayleton was found most effective in inhibiting the mycelial growth and sporulation. These fungicides were also tested under field condition for their control efficacy against the fungus and found that blitox-50 was more effective to control (71.37%) the eye spot disease of sugarcane followed by bayleton (59.26%) and carbendazim(53.64%).

Keywords

Leaf spot Helminthosporium tetramera sugarcane biological chemical control India 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Agnihotri, V.P. (1990). Diseases of Sugarcane and Sugarbeet. Oxford & IBH Pub. Co. New Delhi.Google Scholar
  2. Gowda, K.T. (1986). Control of eye spot disease by different fungicides and extent of loss due to eye spot disease of Sugarcane.Current Research,15: 14–15.Google Scholar
  3. Kumaraswami, S. and Urs, S.D. (1978). Eye Spot disease of Sugarcane- Some observations on its out break in Mandya distric.Indian Sugar Crops Journal,5: 40–42.Google Scholar
  4. Martin, J.P. (1961). Sugarcane disease of the world. Elsevier Pub. Co. New Delhi Vol. I.Google Scholar
  5. Pawar, B.H., Hapese, R.S. and Patil, A.S. (1994). Natural incidence of major disease on promising genotypes of sugarcane under zonal Varietal trials in Maharashtra. Proc. 7th Joint Conv STA and DSTA, 657–666.Google Scholar
  6. Rao, G.P. and Srivastava, A.K. (1994). Current trends in Sugarcane Pathology. International Book and Periodical Supply Service, New Delhi.Google Scholar
  7. Rao, G.P., Sharma, S.R. and Singh, P.K. (2000). Fungitoxic and Insect repellent efficiency of limonene against Sugarcane Pest. J. Essential oil Bearing Plants,3: 157–163.Google Scholar
  8. Sharma, S.R., Singh, G.P. and Singh, D.N. (1996). Effect of temperature, light and PH on the growth and development of H. tetramera causing leaf spot disease of Sugarcane.Bharatiya Sugar,21: 49–50.Google Scholar
  9. Singh, S.P., Rao, G.P. and Upadhyay, P. P. (1998). Fungitoxicity of some Essential oils of aromatic plants against Sugarcane Pathogens.Sugarcane,2: 7–10.Google Scholar
  10. Sutar, A.R. and Dhumal, K.N. (1994). Effect of eye spot disease on some organic constituents and juice quality in different Sugarcane cultivars. Proc. 7th Joint Conv. S.T.A. and D.S.T.A. 633–636.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Society for Sugar Research & Promotion 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. R. Sharma
    • 1
  • R. K. Gaur
    • 1
  • Ashutosh Singh
    • 1
  • Pratibha Singh
    • 1
  • G. P. Rao
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Sugarcane Research StationUttar PradeshIndia

Personalised recommendations