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Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 363–378 | Cite as

Biological production of alcohols from coal through indirect liquefaction

Scientific note
  • S. Barik
  • S. Prieto
  • S. B. Harrison
  • E. C. Clausen
  • J. L. Gaddy
Session 4-Scientific Note

Conclusions

A bacterial culture has been isolated from animal waste that is capable of converting CO in synthesis gas to ethanol and acetate. The culture requires a yeast extract level of approximately.01 g/L, and the conversion is enhanced by agitation. The culture produces a higher yield of ethanol and ratio of ethanol to acetate when BESA and excess yeast extract are removed from the media. An ethanol concentration of 4.3 g/L has been obtained in batch screening experiments.

The culture has been purified by successive dilution and tentatively identified as a member of theClostridium species. Further experimentation is required for positive identification.

Index Entries

Coal indirect liquefaction carbon monoxide alcohols ethanol 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Barik
    • 1
  • S. Prieto
    • 1
  • S. B. Harrison
    • 1
  • E. C. Clausen
    • 1
  • J. L. Gaddy
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ArkansasDepartment of Chemical EngineeringFayetteville

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