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Intereconomics

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 184–193 | Cite as

How to manage tropical forests more sustainably: The case of Indonesia

  • Rainer Thiele
Environmental Protection

Abstract

Although there is a rationale for a more conservative management of the remaining tropical forests, policy-makers in the tropical countries tend to be reluctant to implement appropriate policy measures, because they fear the short-run economic costs of environmental protection. Taking Indonesia as an example, the following article outlines how it is possible to protect tropical forests more effectively without necessarily foregoing economic gains.

Keywords

Tropical Forest Forest Resource Forestry Sector Foreign Exchange Earning Indonesian Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rainer Thiele
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of World EconomicsKielGermany

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