Isotopic fractionation and profile evolution of a melting snowcover

  • Zhou Shiqiao 
  • M. Nakawo
  • S. Hashimoto
  • A. Sakai
  • H. Narita
  • N. Ishikawa
Article

Abstract

Successive snow pits were dug intensively in a melting snowcover. Water was successfully separated from snow grains in the field for the first time. By measuring δ18O values of water and snow grain samples as well as comparing isotopic profiles, it is found that meltwater percolating down in snow develops quick and clear isotopic fractionation with snow grains, but exerts no clear impact on the δ18O profile of the snowcover through which the meltwater percolates.

Keywords

snowcover melt isotopic fractionation δ18

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Dansgaard, W. et al., Evidence for general instability of past climate from a 250-kyr ice-core record, Nature, 1993, 364: 218–220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lorius, C. et al., A 150,000-year climatic record from Antarctic ice, Nature, 1985, 316: 591–596.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Koerner, R. M., Some comments on climatic reconstructions from ice cores drilled in areas of high melt, Journal of Glaciology, 1997, 43: 90–97.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Nakawo, M. et al., Isotopic fractionation during grain coarsening of wet snow, Annals of Glaciology, 1993, 18: 129–134.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Zhou Shiqiao et al., Mathematical modeling of water percolation in snow, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 2001, 1: 6–10 (In Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Colbeck, S. C., A theory of water percolation in snow, Journal of Glaciology, 1972, 11: 369–385.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Shimizu, H., Air permeability of deposited snow, Contrib. Inst. of Low Temp. Sci., 1970, A22: 1–32.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Colbeck, S. C., Anderson, E. A., The permeability of a melting snow cover, Water Resources Research, 1982, 18: 904.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Zhou Shiqiao et al., Verification of different empirical formulas for the calculation of turbulent heat on the snow surface. Journal of Human Normal University, 2000, 23(2): 88–92, 96 (In Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kono, N. et al, Hydrological phenomena of snow and ice, Kokin shoen press, 1994, 36(In Japanese).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Nakawo, M., Hayakawa, N., ed. Snow and Ice Science in Hydrology, IHAS, Nagoya University and UNESCO, 1998, 71.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Suzuoki, T., Kimura, T., D/H and18O/16O fractionation in ice-water system, Mass Spectroscopy, 1973, 21: 229–233.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhou Shiqiao 
    • 1
  • M. Nakawo
    • 2
  • S. Hashimoto
    • 2
  • A. Sakai
    • 2
  • H. Narita
    • 3
  • N. Ishikawa
    • 3
  1. 1.College of Land and ResourcesHunan Normal UniversityChangshaChina
  2. 2.Institute for Hydrospheric-Atmospheric SciencesNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Institute of Low Temperature ScienceHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan

Personalised recommendations