Advertisement

Regional variation of cancer mortality incidence and its relation to selenium levels in China

  • Shu-Yu Yu
  • Ya-Jun Chu
  • Xin-Lan Gong
  • Chong Hou
  • Wen-Guang Li
  • Hui-Min Gong
  • Jin-Rong Xie
Original Articles

Abstract

The epidemiological relationship between selenium level and age-adjusted human cancer mortality (incidence) was studied in 24 regions located in eight provinces of China. Statistically significant inverse correlation was found between age-adjusted total cancer death rates and selenium levels in whole blood from local residents. In the areas with high selenium levels, there was significantly lower mortality in both males and females from cancer of the stomach and esophagus. In addition, an inverse correlation between regional distribution of liver cancer incidence and selenium contents in blood and grains in Qidong county, an area with high risk of hepatoma, was observed. With the intention of providing selenium supplements to residents living in low selenium regions, the selenium content in grains was raised by means of foliar spraying of crops with Na2SeO3 solution.

Index Entries

Selenium, cancer mortality correlation cancer mortality, stomach, esophagus, liver, inverse associatioin with blood selenium level selenium, in high risk areas for liver cancer China, selenium and cancer distribution in selenium supplementation, enrichment of selenium in grains foliar spraying with selenite, of grains stomach cancer mortality rate, and selenium in China esophageal cancer mortality rate, and selenium in China liver cancer mortality rate, and selenium in China 

References

  1. 1.
    R. J. Shamberger,J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 44, 931 (1970).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    G. N. Schrauzer and D. Ishmael,Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 4, 441 (1974).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    A. H. Daoud and A. C. Griffin,Cancer Lett. 9, 299 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. M. Jacobs, B. Jansson, and A. C. Griffin,Cancer Lett. 2, 133 (1977).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    H. J. Thompson and P. J. Pecci,J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 65, 1229 (1980).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    R. J. Shamberger, S. Tytko, and C. Willis,Trace Subst. Environm. Health 7, 35 (1974).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    G. N. Schrauzer,Bioinorg. Chem. 6, 265 (1976).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    G. N. Schrauzer, D. A. White, and C. J. Schneider,Bioinorg. Chem. 7, 36 (1977).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    R. J. Shamberger, S. Tytko, and C. Willis,Arch. Environ. Health,31, 231 (1976).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    C. C. Y. Chan,Anal. Chim. Acta 82 213 (1976).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    J. Harr, J. Exon, P. Whanger and P. Weswig,Clinical Toxicol. 5, 187 (1972).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    C. C. Clayton and C. A. Baumann,Cancer Res. 9, 575 (1949).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    A. C. Griffin and M. M. Jacobs,Cancer Lett. 3, 197 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    G. Q. Yang et al.,Acta Nutr. Sinica 4, 1 (1982).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shu-Yu Yu
    • 1
  • Ya-Jun Chu
    • 1
  • Xin-Lan Gong
    • 1
  • Chong Hou
    • 1
  • Wen-Guang Li
    • 2
  • Hui-Min Gong
    • 2
  • Jin-Rong Xie
    • 2
  1. 1.Cancer InstituteChinese Academy of Medical SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.Qidong Liver Cancer InstituteJiangsuChina

Personalised recommendations