Irish Journal of Medical Science

, Volume 173, Issue 1, pp 34–37

Naltrexone for alcohol-dependent patients

  • J Ahmadi
  • M Babaeebeigi
  • I Maany
  • J Porter
  • M Mohagheghzadeh
  • N Ahmadi
  • G Dehbozorgi
Original Paper

Abstract

Background Clinical trials have shown that naltrexone 50mg/day reduces alcohol consumption and relapse rates in alcohol dependents.

Aim To investigate the efficacy of 50mg/day dose of naltrexone in the maintenance of alcohol-dependent subjects over a 36-week treatment period.

Methods Subjects were randomised into two equal groups, consisting of 116 male alcohol-dependent patients who met the DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence and were seeking treatment. The participants received naltrexone or placebo at a dose of 50mg/day and were treated in an outpatient clinic, offering a weekly 0.5-hour individual counselling session. Days retained in treatment were measured.

Results Forty-one participants (35.3%) completed the 36-week study. Completion rates by group were 44.8% for the 50mg naltrexone group and 25.9% for the placebo group (x2=4.56, DF=1, 2-sided significance=0.033).

Conclusion The results support the efficacy and safety of naltrexone for outpatient treatment of alcohol-dependent individuals in Iran.

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Copyright information

© Springer London 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • J Ahmadi
    • 1
  • M Babaeebeigi
    • 1
  • I Maany
    • 1
  • J Porter
    • 1
  • M Mohagheghzadeh
    • 1
  • N Ahmadi
    • 1
  • G Dehbozorgi
    • 1
  1. 1.Shiraz University of Medical SciencesShiraz, Fars ProvinceIran

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