Advertisement

Wool wax acids: A review

  • K. Motiuk
SD&C Technical

Abstract

Wool wax acids consist predominantly of alkanoic,α-hydroxy andω-hydroxy acids. Each group contains normal, iso, and anteiso series of various chain length. Practically all the acids are saturated. The average weight-percent of the various series is based on recently published results.

Keywords

Unsaturated Acid Hydroxy Acid Lanolin Lithium Aluminum Hydride Wool Grease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Schulze, E., Ber. Chem. Ges. 7:570 (1874); J. Prakt. Chem. 9:321 (1874).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    DeSanctis, J., Gazz. Chim. Ital. 24:14 (1894).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Darmstaedter, L., J. Lifschutz, Ber. Chem. Ges. 29:618, 1474, 2890 (1896); 31:97, 1122 (1898).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Rohman, F., Biochem. Z. 77:298 (1916).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Drummond, J.C., and L.C. Baker, J. Soc. Chem. Ind. 48:232T (1929).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Abraham, E.E.V., and T.P. Hilditch, Ibid. 54:398T (1935).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kuwata, T., and J. Ishii, J. Soc. Chem. Ind. Jpn. 39:B317 (1936).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Heiduschka, A., and B. Nier, J. Prakt. Chem. N.F. 149:98 (1937).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kuwata, T., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 60:559 (1938).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Nozoe, T., Japan 153, 628, (Chem. Abs. 43:3219) Nov. 10, 1942.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Weitkamp, A.W., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 67:447 (1945).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Truter, E.V., in “Wool Wax,” Cleaver Hume Press Ltd., London, pp. 35 and 58 (1956).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Velick, S.F., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 69:2317 (1947).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Bertram, S.H., JAOCS 26:454 (1949).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Horn, D.H.S., F.W. Hougen, E. von Rudloff, Chem. & Ind. 106:(1953).Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Horn, D.H.S., F.W. Hougen, E. von Rudloff, and D.A. Sutton, J. Chem. Soc. 177 (1954).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Conrad, L.I., J. Soc. Cosmet. Chem. 5:11 (1954).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Radell, J., A. Eisner, and E.T. Donahue, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 76:4188 (1954).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Barnes, C.S., Aust. J. Chem. 13(1):184 (1960).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Horn, D.H.S., and Y.Y. Pretorius, Chem. & Ind. R27 (1956).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Noble, W.R., A. Eisner, and J.T. Scanlan, JAOCS 37:14 (1960).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Milburn, A.H., and E.V. Truter, J. Appl. Chem. 12:156 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Horn, D.H.S., and D. Ilse, Chem. & Ind. 524 (1956).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Downing, D.T., Z.H. Kranz, and K.E. Murray, Aust. J. Chem. 13:80 (1960).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Truter, E.V., J. Soc. Cosmet. Chem. 13:173 (1962).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Pelick, N., and J.W. Shigley, JAOCS 44:121 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Fawaz, F., M. Chaigneau, and F. Puisieux, Ann. Pharm. Franc. 31:217 (1973).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Fawaz, F., C. Miet and F. Puisieux, Ibid. 32:59 (1974).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The American Oil Chemists’ Society 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Motiuk
    • 1
  1. 1.Amerchol Corporationa Unit of CPC International Inc.Edison

Personalised recommendations