Oleochemical surfactants and lubricants in the textile industry

  • Thomas J. Proffitt
  • H. Thomas Patterson
Surfactants & Detergents Technical
  • 108 Downloads

Abstract

This paper reviews the published literature on the uses of oleochemical surfactants and lubricants in the textile industry with a dual emphasis on textile technology and effects that oleochemicals can have on that technology. Oleochemical derivatives are used in the textile industry as surfactants, emulsifiers, wetting agents, antistatic agents, softeners, antimicrobial agents, water and oil repellents, antisoil agents, lubricants, cohesive agents and dyeing assistants. The relationship between the amount of fatty acid derivatives consumed in textile operations and global fiber production is discussed. Small amounts of oleochemicals acting at interfaces are invaluable in their effects on textiles. Oleochemical surfactant chemical and physical properties of importance in textile operations are described, and the relationships between certain properties of oleochemicals and their performance on textile fibers are reviewed. The basic principles and technology of spin finishes and textile processing aids are discussed. The effects of oleochemical surfactants in dyeing and as finishing agents for textile fibers are described briefly. The conclusion presents the prognosis for the future of oleochemicals in the textile industry.

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Copyright information

© American Oil Chemists’ Society 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Proffitt
    • 1
  • H. Thomas Patterson
    • 2
  1. 1.Fiber Surface Research Section, Textile Fibers DepartmentE.l. de Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc.Kinston
  2. 2.E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Inc., retiredGreenville

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