Economic Botany

, Volume 31, Issue 4, pp 461–470 | Cite as

Economic importance of black tree lichen (Bryoria fremontii) to the Indians of western North America

  • Nancy J. Turner
Article

Abstract

Bryoria fremontii (Tuck.) Brodo & D. Hawksw. (syn.Alectoria fremontii Tuck.) was an important source of food for the interior Indian peoples of western North America from northern British Columbia to northern California. It and related species were also used as materials for clothing and medicine and are known to appear in native mythical traditions. The extent of the use of this lichen and the means of its collection and preparation are detailed in this paper.

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy J. Turner
    • 1
  1. 1.Research AssociateBritish Columbia Provincial MuseumVictoriaCanada

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