Purification of α-acetolactate decarboxylase from Lactobacillus casei DSM 2547

  • Anne M. Rasmussen
  • Richard M. Gibson
  • Sven Erik Godtfredsen
  • Martin Ottesen
Article

Abstract

α-Acetolactate decarboxylase has been purified to homogeneity, by fast protein liquid chromatography and high performance elution chromatography, from a partially purified α-acetolactate decarboxylase preparation from Lactobacillus casei DSM 2547. The pure enzyme exhibited a specific activity of 375 kU·mg−1 and exerted its optimal activity at pH 4.5 to 5.0 and at a temperature of 40°C. Its isoelectric point was estimated to pH 4.7 and its molecular weight was found to be 48,000. The enzyme was inhibited by o-phenanthroline and could be partially reactivated by zinc ions. An HPLC method for the determination of α-acetolactate is described.

Keywords

α-acetolactate α-acetolactate decarboxylase acetoin diacetyl lactic acid bacteria beer maturation HPLC 

Abbreviations

ALDC

α-acetolactate decarboxylase

AUFS

absorbance units full scale

BSA

bovine serum albumin

DSM

Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen

EDTA

ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid

HPEC

high performance exclusion chromatography

HPLC

high performance liquid chromatography

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Copyright information

© Carlsberg Laboratory 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne M. Rasmussen
    • 1
  • Richard M. Gibson
    • 1
  • Sven Erik Godtfredsen
    • 1
  • Martin Ottesen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryCarlsberg LaboratoryCopenhagen Valby

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