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Book reviews

  • Larissa Bonfante
  • Norman Austin
  • Lisa Raphals
  • Simon Goldhill
  • Allen Kerkeslager
  • Klaus Rosen
  • Mary Walsh Meany
  • Gary P. Cestaro
  • Albert Rabil
  • Kenneth Lloyd-Jones
  • Robert W. Gaston
  • Gordon Braden
  • Robert C. Evans
  • J. E. Ziolkowski
  • Lorna Hardwick
  • Stanley M. Burstein
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References

  1. 1.
    German original:Die Tochter des Augus (Mainz 1981), English translation by the author (London 1987).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Luisa Banti,Il Mondo degli Etruschi (Rome 1969), translted asThe Etruscan Cities and their Culture (Berkeley and London 1973).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Maria Bonghi Iovino and Cristina Chiaramonte Treré,Tarquinia. Testimonianze archeologiche e ricostruzione storica. Scavi sistematici nell'abitato, 1982–1988 (Rome 1997). See the useful review by Nicola Terrenato,American Journal of Archaeology 104 (2000) 404–405.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    We can compare other Villanovan customs and costumes retained by the conservative Roman religion, such as early stages of the trimuph. (L. Bonfante, “Roman Triumps and Etruscan Kings: the Changing Face of the Triumph,”Journal of Roman Studies 60 [1970] 49–66), or the typical pointed hat of theflamines, best seen on the procession of the Ara Pacis (L. Bonfante [Warren], “Roman Costumes. A Glossary and Some Etruscan Derivations,”Aufstieg und Niedergang der Römischen Welt/Rise and Decline of the Roma World [ANRW] I.4, edited by Hildegard Temporini [Berlin and New York 1973] 582–614, esp. 587–589).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    The Etruscans, edited by Mario Torelli. Catalogue of the exhibition at Palazzo Grassi, Venice, November 26, 2000–July 1, 2001 (London 2000). Translated from the Italian,Gli Etruschi (Milan 2000).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Principi Etruschi tra il Mediterraneo e Europa, edited by Cristiana Morigi Govi, Catalogue of the exhibition at the Museo Civico, Bologna, October, 2000 to April, 2001.Principi Guerrieri. La Necropoli Etrusca Orientalizzante di Casale Marittimo, exhibition in Cecina (Volterra) and Florence.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Carri da guerra e Principi Etruschi, by Adriana Emiliozzi, exhibited in Viterbo, Rome, Ancona, 1998–2000 (Rome 1998).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Andrea Carandini,La Nascita di Roma. Dèi, lari, eroi e uomini all'alba di una civiltà (Turin 1997), and exhibit at the Museo Nazionale in the Baths of Diocletian,Roma. Romolo, Remo e la fondazione della città, June–October, 2000.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Cetamura antica. Traditions of Chianti, edited by Nancy T. de Grummond. Catalogue published in English and Italian (Tallahassee, Florida, 2000).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    See review by Richard De Puma,Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2001.10.19. This was clearly an editorial decision, and indeed a general audience—my students—loved the layout of the illustrations and the presentation in general. Another recent survey, Giovannangelo Camporeale,Gli Etruschi. Storia e Civiltà (Turin, 2000), also lacks footnotes, though it has individual chapter bibliographies.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Capaneus:Inferno 14.46, 25.15. Count Ugolino:Inferno 32.125, 33.2.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    L. Bonfante, “The Corsini Throne,” in:Essays in Honor of Dorothy K. Hill = The Journal of the Walters Art Gallery 36 (1977) 111–122. M. Torelli, “The ‘Corsini Throne’. A Monument to the Etruscan Genealogy of a Roma Gens,” in: Torelli,Tota Italia. Essays in the Cultural Formation of Roman Italy (Oxford, 1999) 150–183.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    [The present reviewer will discuss the remaining volumes in a review to be published in the next issue (9.2) ofIJCT.—W.H.]Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Ford bases his conjecture on such probative evidence as the watermark in the paper used (p. XVI).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    It will be remembered that, in his 1558 translation of Plato'sSymposium (Le Sympose de Platon, ou De l'amour et de la Beauté …, Paris: J. Longis & R. Le Magnyer), Le Roy omits the entire passage on the love of Alcibiades for Socrates, because the depiction of homosexuality in a translation meant to show the Christian dimensions of neo-Platonism would be a cause for scandal. See my “«Beeles Fictions & Descriptions Exquises…»: Translative Stategies for Christianizing Greek Thought in the Renaissance,”French Literature Series (FLS) XXV, 1998, pp. 26–40.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Accentuation of the Greek corrected in the footnotes.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ford suggests that Dorat is responsible for this reference, “sans doute pour renforcer l'authenticité des Sirènes” (p. XXV), but the “sans doute” is perhaps a little too categoric. Like Dorat (and so many others!), we are faced with an unstable text, and so we must interpret what it says in the light of what we believe it means.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Greek corrected in editorial footnotes.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    The note (p. 148)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Such indeed was precisely the posture adopted by Le Roy as he “translated” Platonism into Neo-Platonism: see n. 2 above.Symposium (Le Sympose de Platon, ou De l'amour, et de la Beauté …, Paris: J. Longis & R. Le Magnyer)Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Meyer Reinhold, for example, cites comparisons of Washington to Plutarchian heroes but not to Aeneas (Reinhold,Classica Americana: the Greek and Roman heritage in the United States [Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1984], p. 258).Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    From the work of Tom Paulin may be cited ‘A new look at the language question’,Field Day Pamphlet number 1 (Derry: Field Day Theatre Company, 1983);Ireland and the English Crisis (Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Bloodaxe Books, 1984);The Riot Act: A Version of Sophocles’ Antigone (London: Faber and Faber, 1985);The Faber Book of Political Verse (London: Faber and Faber, 1986);Seize the Fire: A version of Aeschylus’ Prometheus Bound (London: Faber and Faber, 1990) and from Paul Muldoon,The Birds (After Aristophanes) (Oldcastle, County Meath: Gallery Books, 1999).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Of particular importance on Heaney's language are: Blake Morrison,Seamus Heaney (London: Methuen, 1982); Bernard O'Donoghue,Seamus Heaney and the Language of Poetry (New York: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1994), which focuses on Heaney's commentary on poetry as well as his language; Neil Corcoran,The Poetry of Seamus Heaney: A Critical Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1986, revised and enlarged 1998). For the broader context of Irish literature and cultural politics see David Cairns and Shaun Richards,Writing Ireland: Colonialism, nationalism and culture (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1988); Seamus Deane (ed. and intro.),The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing, 3 vols. (Derry: The Field Day Company, 1991); John Kerrigan, ‘Ulster Ovids’, in: N Corcoran (ed.),The Chosen Ground: Essays on the Contemporary Poetry of Northern Ireland (Bridgend, Mid Glamorgan: Seren, 1992); Robert Welsh,Changing States: Transformation in Modern Irish Writing (London: Routledge, 1993); Declan Kiberd,Inventing Ireland (London: Jonathan Cape, 1995), Michael Cronin,Translating Ireland: Translation, Languages, Cultures (Cork: Cork University Press, 1996). For discussion of the cultural politics of Heaney's use of language see Sean O'Brien,The Deregulated Muse: Essays on Contemporary British and Irish Poetry (Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Bloodaxe Books, 1998) pp. 89–96 and for Heaney and the Irish classical tradition Lorna Hardwick,Translating Words, Translating Cultures (London: Duckworth, 2000) chapter 5. For critical rejection of Heaney's approach to identity issues, see David Lloyd,Anomalous States: Irish Writing and the Post-Colonial Moment (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1993), especially pp. 13–40, and note that Heaney is not even indexed in David Lloyd,Ireland after History (Cork: Cork University Press in association with Field Day, 1999). Stephen Howe,Ireland and Empire: Colonial Legacies in Irish History and Culture (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000) discusses Heaney's doubts about the value of colonial discourse analysis and his views on the virtues of flexible and plural identities but attacks the now almost conventional assumption that the work of novelists, playwrights and poets is a decisive forum for forging of a new Irish identity (p. 131).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    The allusion is the Bloody Sunday massacre of 30 January 1972 when 13 civilians were killed by British soldiers in Derry (a fourteenth died later).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    In the summer 2002 public debate about the proposed closure of the Classics Department at Queen's University, Belfast, Heaney reaffirmed the importance of classical literature for all forms of creative writing.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    The fullest review of the controversy is Jacques Berlinerblau,Heresy in the University: The Black Athena Controversy and the Responsibilities of American Intellectuals (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1999).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    The first substantial European response was a special issue of the journalTalanta edited by Wim M.J. van Binsbergen entitledBlack Athena: Ten Years After (Talanta 28–29 [1996–1997]).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    For this tradition see Wilson Jeremiah MosesAfrotopia: The Roots of African American Popular History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Despite the similarity of some of its conclusions,Black Athena is not an Afrocentrist work, and Afrocentrist response to Bernal's historical reconstructions has been generally critical; cf. Stephen Howe,Afrocentrism: Mythical Pasts and Imagined Homes (London: Verso, 1998), pp. 204–206.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    A pioneering example is Michele Valerie Ronnick, “Racial Ideology and the Classics in the African-American University Experience,”The Classical Bulletin 76 (2000), pp. 169–180.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larissa Bonfante
    • 1
  • Norman Austin
    • 2
  • Lisa Raphals
    • 3
  • Simon Goldhill
    • 4
  • Allen Kerkeslager
    • 5
  • Klaus Rosen
    • 6
  • Mary Walsh Meany
    • 7
  • Gary P. Cestaro
    • 8
  • Albert Rabil
    • 9
  • Kenneth Lloyd-Jones
    • 10
  • Robert W. Gaston
    • 11
  • Gordon Braden
    • 12
  • Robert C. Evans
    • 13
  • J. E. Ziolkowski
    • 14
  • Lorna Hardwick
    • 15
  • Stanley M. Burstein
    • 16
  1. 1.Department of ClassicsNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of ClassicsUniversity of ArizonaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Comparative Literature and Foreign LanguagesUniversity of CaliforniaRiverside
  4. 4.King's CollegeUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  5. 5.Department of TheologySaint Joseph's UniversityUK
  6. 6.Seminar für Alte GeschichteFriedrich-Wilhelms-Universität BonnBonnDeutschland
  7. 7.Department of Religious StudiesSiena CollegeLondon villeUSA
  8. 8.Dept. of Modern LanguagesDePaul UniversityUSA
  9. 9.Chapel Hill
  10. 10.Department of Modern LanguagesTrinity CollegeConn
  11. 11.Department of Art HistoryLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  12. 12.Department of EnglishUniversity of VirginiaVirginiaCanada
  13. 13.Department of English and PhilosophyAuburn University MontgomeryMontgomeryUSA
  14. 14.Department of Classical and Semitic Languages and LiteraturesGeorge Washington UniversityUSA
  15. 15.Department of Classical StudiesThe Open UniversityUK
  16. 16.Department of HistoryCalifornia State UniversityLos Angeles

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