Science in China Series A: Mathematics

, Volume 45, Supplement 1, pp 120–131

Multiple ground-based observations at Zhongshan Station during the april/may 1998 solar events

  • Liu Ruiyuan 
  • Hu Hongqiao 
  • He Longsong 
  • Liu Yonghua 
  • Liu Shunlin 
  • Li Shenggui 
  • N. Sato
  • B. J. Fraser
Article

Abstract

Simultaneous observations at Zhongshan Station, Antarctica, during May 1–7, 1998 are presented to show the responses of the polar ionosphere to the April/May 1998 solar events. One of the main geo-effects of the solar events resulted in the major magnetic storm on May 4. At the storm onset on May 2 the ionosphere F2 layer abruptly increased in altitude, the geomagnetic H-component started negative deviation and the spectral amplitude of the ULF wave intensified. Both large isolated riometer absorption and large negative deviation of the geomagnetic H-component occurred at about 0639UT. There was a time lag of about one hour and ten minutes between the storm onset and the IMF southward turning, as measured by the WIND satellite. The polar ionosphere was highly disturbed, as shown by frequent large deviations of the geomagnetic H-component, large riometer absorption events and strong ULF waves in all the courses of the storm. The absorption increased greatly causing the digisonde to be blackout most of the time. However, the data still showed a substantial decrease in the F2 electron density and oscillation of the F2 layer peak height with an amplitude exceeding 200 km.

Keywords

polar ionosphere magnetic storm cosmic noise absorption ULF wave solar activity CME 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liu Ruiyuan 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hu Hongqiao 
    • 1
  • He Longsong 
    • 1
  • Liu Yonghua 
    • 1
  • Liu Shunlin 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Li Shenggui 
    • 1
  • N. Sato
    • 3
  • B. J. Fraser
    • 4
  1. 1.Polar Research Institute of ChinaShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Department of Radio Science and TechnologyWuhan UniversityWuhanChina
  3. 3.National Institute of Polar ResearchTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of PhysicsUniversity of NewcastleAustralia

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