Science in China Series C: Life Sciences

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 92–98

Cloning, mapping and mutation analysis of human geneGJB5 encoding gap junction protein β-5

  • Jiahui Xia
  • Duo Zheng
  • Dongsheng Tang
  • Heping Dai
  • Qian Pan
  • Zhigao Long
  • Xiaodong Liao
Article
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

By homologous EST searching and nested PCR a new human geneGJB5 encoding gap junction protein β-5 was identified.GJB5 was genetically mapped to human chromosome 1p33-p35 by FISH. RT-PCR revealed that it was expressed in skin, placenta and fetal skin. DNA sequencing ofGJB5 was carried out in 142 patients with sensorineural hearing impairment and probands of 36 families with genetic diseases, including erythrokeratodermia (5 families), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (13), ptosis (4), and retinitis pigmentosa and deafness (14). Two missense mutations (686A→G, H229R; 25C→T, L9F) were detected in two sensorineural hearing impairment families. A heterologous deletion of 18 bp within intron was found in 3 families with heredity hearing impairment, and in one of the 3 families, a missense mutation (R265P) was identified also. But the deletion and missense mutation seemed not segregating with hearing impairment in the family. No abnormal mRNA or mRNA expression was detected in deletion carriers by RT-PCR analysis in skin tissue. Mutation analysis in 199 unaffected individuals revealed that two of them were carriers with the same 18 bp deletion.

Keywords

gap junction protein gene cloning mapping mutation analysis mRNA 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiahui Xia
    • 1
  • Duo Zheng
    • 1
  • Dongsheng Tang
    • 1
  • Heping Dai
    • 1
  • Qian Pan
    • 1
  • Zhigao Long
    • 1
  • Xiaodong Liao
    • 1
  1. 1.Hunan Medical UniversityState Key Laboratory of Medical GeneticsChangshaChina

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