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Folia Microbiologica

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 229–235 | Cite as

Contribution to the taxonomy of haemolytic corynebacteria

  • J. Julák
  • M. Mára
  • F. Patočka
  • B. Potužníková
  • S. Zadražil
Article

Abstract

In an attempt to assess the taxonomic relationships among human (Corynebacterium haemolyticum), animal (Corynebacterium pyogenes bovis) haemolytio corynebacteria, typical corynebacteria (Corynebacterium diphteriae mitis, C. ovis, C. ulcerans) and group A and G streptococci, a number of biochemical parameters were established: the DNA content of G + C, the presence of the cytochrome system, composition of fatty acids in free lipids and production of carboxylic acids as end products of fermentation. It was found that according to the above criteria, streptococci differed significantly from the corynebacteria studied. In addition, it was possible to differentiate a subgroup of typically aerobic haemolytic corynebacteria (different from both human and animal corynebacteria), possessing a complete cytochrome system, producing propionic acid and having a different composition of fatty acids.

Keywords

Propionic Acid Fumaric Acid Mycolic Acid Butyl Ester Free Lipid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Julák
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Mára
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Patočka
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. Potužníková
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Zadražil
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Special Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of MedicineCharles UniversityPrague 2
  2. 2.Institute of Organic ChemistryCzechoslovak Academy of SciencesPrague 6

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