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Fibers and Polymers

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 262–269 | Cite as

Dyeing behavior of low temperature plasma treated wool

  • C. W. Kan
Article

Abstract

In this paper, the effects of low temperature plasma (LTP) treatment on the dyeing properties of the wool fiber were studied. The wool fibers were treated with oxygen plasma and three types of dye that commonly used for wool dyeing, namely: (i) acid dye, (ii) chrome dye and (iii) reactive dye, were used in the dyeing process. For acid dyeing, the dyeing rate of the LTP-treated wool fiber was greatly increased but the final dyeing exhaustion equilibrium did not show any significant change. For chrome dyeing, the dyeing rate of the LTP-treated wool fiber was also increased but the final dyeing exhaustion equilibrium was only increased to a small extent. In addition, the rate of afterchroming process was similar to the chrome dyeing process. For the reactive dyeing, the dyeing rate of the LTP-treated wool fiber was greatly increased and also the final dyeing exhaustion equilibrium was increased significantly. As a result, it could conclude that the LTP treatment could improve the dyeing behavior of wool fiber in different dyeing systems.

Keywords

Wool Low temperature plasma Acid dyeing Chrome dyeing Reactive dyeing 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Fiber Society 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Textiles and ClothingThe Hong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHong KongChina

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