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Molecular biology and immunology of fungal allergens

  • Viswanath P. KurupEmail author
  • Banani Banerjee
  • Kevin J. Kelly
  • Jordan N. Fink
Heart Diseases

Abstract

Fungi are non-chlorophyllus microorganisms, which constitutes the main source of outdoor and indoor allergens. The antigens present in the spores and fragments of hyphae induce allergic responses in sensitized patients. The frequently recognized fungi associated with asthma include Alternaria, Cladosporium, Aspergillus, and Penicillium. With the advent of molecular biology techniques a number of fungal genes encoding relevant allergens have been cloned and the expressed allergens purified and characterized. In this review, we have presented the recent developments, where recombinant allergens have been used in the precise diagnosis of fungal allergy. We have also discussed the role played by these allergens and the T- and B-cell epitopes in the immune mechanism in fungal allergy.

Key Words

Fungal allergy Allergens Epitopes Immunoassays 

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Copyright information

© Association of Clinical Biochemists of India 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Viswanath P. Kurup
    • 1
    Email author
  • Banani Banerjee
    • 1
  • Kevin J. Kelly
    • 1
  • Jordan N. Fink
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, and Research Service, Allergy-Immunology DivisionVA Medical CenterMilwaukeeUSA

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