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Economic Botany

, Volume 53, Issue 2, pp 217–223 | Cite as

Notes on economic plants

  • Simcha Lev-Yadun
  • Shahal Abbo
  • Mieke van Grinsven
  • Moringe L. Parkipuny
  • Timothy Johns
  • Carmen ZepedaEmail author
  • Antonio LotEmail author
Article

Keywords

Tannin Bark Economic Botany Authority Area Palestinian Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© New York Botanical Garden Press 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simcha Lev-Yadun
    • 1
  • Shahal Abbo
    • 2
  • Mieke van Grinsven
    • 3
  • Moringe L. Parkipuny
    • 4
  • Timothy Johns
    • 5
  • Carmen Zepeda
    • 6
    Email author
  • Antonio Lot
    • 7
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Natural Resources, Agricultural Research OrganizationThe Volcani CenterBet DaganIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Field Crops, Vegetables and Genetics, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality SciencesThe Hebrew University of JerusalemRehovotIsrael
  3. 3.ASILIA LtdArushaTanzania
  4. 4.LoliondoTanzania
  5. 5.School of Dietetics and Human NutritionMacdonald Campus, McGill UniversityQuebec
  6. 6.Facultad de CienciasUniversidad Autónoma del Estado de MéxicoTolucaMéxico
  7. 7.Instituto de BiologiaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoMéxicoMéxico

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