Economic Botany

, Volume 47, Issue 3, pp 215–219

The economic value and sustainable harvest of plants and animals from the tropical forest: Assumptions, hypotheses, and methods

  • Ricardo A. Godoy
  • Kamaljit S. Bawa
Article

Abstract

Recent studies of non-timber products from tropical rain forests have emphasized the economic value of these products and the sustainability of present harvests. Many of these studies rely upon a set of untested assumptions about the effects of harvesting upon the forest and the economic value of non-timber forest products in both the marketplace and in the daily life of rural people. These assumptions were formulated as a series of hypotheses during the workshop held in the Regional Community Forestry Training Center, Kesetsart University, Bangkok, in May 1992. The six hypotheses developed by workshop participants will be used to guide future research. As the hypotheses are tested, the data will be used to create a more realistic assessment of the sustainability and economic value of extraction of non-timber products from tropical forests.

Key Words

non-timber forest products economic valuation sustainability 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. Appasamy, P. 1993. Role of non-timber forest products in a subsistence economy: the case of a joint forestry project in India. Economic Botany 47:258–267.Google Scholar
  2. Bawa, K. S. 1992. The riches of tropical forests: non-timber products. Trends in Ecology and Evolution7:361–363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Browder, J. O. 1992. Social and economic constraints on the development of market-oriented extractive reserves in Amazon rain forests. Pages 33–42in D. C. Nepstad and S. Schwartzman, eds., Non-timber products from tropical forests: evaluation of a conservation and development strategy. Advances in Economic Botany 9. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY.Google Scholar
  4. Chopra, K. 1993. The value of non-timber forest products: an estimate from India. Economic Botany47:251–257.Google Scholar
  5. de Beer, J. H., and M. J. McDermott. 1989. Economic value of non-timber forest products in southeast Asia. Council for the International Union of the Conservation of Nature, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
  6. Godoy, R. 1993. The effect of income on the extraction of non-timber forest products among the Sumu Indians of Nicaragua: preliminary findings. Manuscript. Harvard Institute for International Development, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  7. Godoy, R., R. Lubowski, and A. Markandya. 1993. A method for the economic valuation of non-timber tropical forest products. Economic Botany 47: 220–233.Google Scholar
  8. Gunatilake, H. M., D. M. A. H. Senaratne, and P. Abeygunawardena. 1993. Role of non-timber forest products in the economy of the peripheral communities of Knuckles National Wilderness Area of Sri Lanka: a farming systems approach. Economic Botany47:275–281.Google Scholar
  9. Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N, C. V. S. Gunatilleke, and P. Abeygunawardena. 1993. Interdisciplinary research towards management of non-timber forest resources in lowland rain forests of Sri Lanka. Economic Botany47:282–290.Google Scholar
  10. Hall, P., and K. Bawa. 1993. Methods to assess the impact of extraction of non-timber tropical forest products on plant populations. Economic Botany47:234–247.Google Scholar
  11. Homma, A. K. O. 1992. The dynamics of extraction in Amazonia: a historical perspective. Pages 23–31in D. C. Nepstad and S. Schwartzman, eds., Non-timber products from tropical forests: evaluation of a conservation and development strategy. Advances in Economic Botany 9. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY.Google Scholar
  12. Martin, P. S. 1984. Prehistoric overkill: the global model. Pages 354–403in P. S. Martin and R. G. Klein, eds., Quaternary extinctions. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.Google Scholar
  13. Panayotou, T., and P. Ashton. 1992. Not by timber alone: the case for multiple use management of tropical forests. Island Press, Covelo, CA.Google Scholar
  14. Peters, C. 1992. The ecology and economics of oligarchic forests. Pages 15–22in D. C. Nepstad and S. Schwartzman, eds., Non-timber products from tropical forests: evaluation of a conservation and development strategy. Advances in Economic Botany 9. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY.Google Scholar
  15. Peters, C, A. H. Gentry, and R. O. Mendelsohn. 1989. Valuation of an Amazonian rain forest. Nature339: 655–656.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Phillips, O., and A. H. Gentry. 1993. The useful plants of Tambopata, Peru. I. Statistical hypothesis tests with a new quantitative technique. Economic Botany47:15–32.Google Scholar
  17. Plotkin, M., and L. Famolare, eds. 1992. Sustainable harvest and marketing of rain forest products. Island Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ricardo A. Godoy
    • 1
  • Kamaljit S. Bawa
    • 2
  1. 1.Harvard Institute for International DevelopmentHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of MassachusettsBostonUSA

Personalised recommendations