Economic Botany

, Volume 40, Issue 4, pp 425–433 | Cite as

Frankincense and myrrh

  • Arthur O. Tucker
Article

Abstract

While frankincense and myrrh have been harvested from a multitude of species, certain species have predominated in history.Boswellia carteri andB. frereana are the main sources of frankincense today, whileB. papyrifera was the principal source of antiquity andB. sacra was the principal species of classical times.Commiphora myrrha is the chief source of myrrh today, butC. erythraea was the principal source of ancient and classical times. Each of these oleo-gum-resins has a characteristic odor that is predominately due to a mixture of complex sesquiterpenes.

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Copyright information

© New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY 10458 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur O. Tucker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agriculture and Natural ResourcesDelaware State CollegeDover

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